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Assessing the quality of anti-malarial drugs from Gabonese pharmacies using the MiniLab®: a field study

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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22 Dimensions

Readers on

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70 Mendeley
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Title
Assessing the quality of anti-malarial drugs from Gabonese pharmacies using the MiniLab®: a field study
Published in
Malaria Journal, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12936-015-0795-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Benjamin J Visser, Janneke Meerveld-Gerrits, Daniëlle Kroon, Judith Mougoula, Rieke Vingerling, Emmanuel Bache, Jimmy Boersma, Michèle van Vugt, Selidji T Agnandji, Harparkash Kaur, Martin P Grobusch

Abstract

Recent studies alluded to the alarming scale of poor anti-malarial drug quality in malaria-endemic countries, but also illustrated the major geographical gaps in data on anti-malarial drug quality from endemic countries. Data are particularly scarce from Central Africa, although it carries the highest burden of malaria. The aim of this medicine quality field survey was to determine the prevalence of poor-quality anti-malarial drugs in Gabon. A field survey of the quality of anti-malarial drugs in Gabonese pharmacies was conducted using the Global Pharma Health Fund Minilab(®) tests, following the Medicine Quality Assessment Reporting Guidelines. Anti-malarial drugs were purchased randomly from selected pharmacies in Gabon. Semi-quantitative thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and disintegration testing were carried out to measure the concentration of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). The samples failing the TLC test were analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Following the collection of anti-malarial drugs, a street survey was conducted to understand where people purchase their anti-malarial drugs. A total of 432 samples were purchased from 41 pharmacies in 11 cities/towns in Gabon. The prevalence of poor-quality anti-malarial drugs was 0.5% (95% CI 0.08-1.84%). Two out of 432 samples failed the MiniLab(®) semi-quantitative TLC test, of which a suspected artemether-lumefantrine (AL) sample was classified as falsified and one sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) sample as substandard. High performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet photo diode array detection analysis confirmed the absence of APIs in the AL sample, and showed that the SP sample did contain the stated APIs but the amount was half the stated dose. Of the people interviewed, 92% (187/203) purchased their anti-malarial drugs at a pharmacy. Using the GPHF Minilab(®), the prevalence of poor-quality anti-malarial drugs is far lower than anticipated. The findings emphasize the need for randomized and robust sampling methods in order to collect representative data on anti-malarial drug quality. NTR4341 (Dutch Trial Registry).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 70 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 3%
Japan 1 1%
Unknown 67 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 17%
Researcher 9 13%
Student > Bachelor 6 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Other 7 10%
Unknown 14 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 18 26%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 17 24%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 3%
Other 10 14%
Unknown 16 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 December 2015.
All research outputs
#1,362,659
of 6,644,977 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#588
of 2,317 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#55,025
of 219,518 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#33
of 107 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,644,977 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 79th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,317 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 219,518 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 107 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.