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Pregnant or recently pregnant opioid users: contraception decisions, perceptions and preferences

Overview of attention for article published in Contraception and Reproductive Medicine, March 2018
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Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
16 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
33 Mendeley
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Title
Pregnant or recently pregnant opioid users: contraception decisions, perceptions and preferences
Published in
Contraception and Reproductive Medicine, March 2018
DOI 10.1186/s40834-018-0056-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rebecca L. Fischbein, Bethany G. Lanese, Lynn Falletta, Kelsey Hamilton, Jennifer A. King, Deric R. Kenne

Abstract

Multiple factors are linked to extremely high unintended pregnancy rates among women who use opioids, including various barriers to contraception adherence. These include patient level barriers such as lack of knowledge and education about highly effective contraception, and potential provider barriers. Using a mixed-methods framework to examine the contraception-related perceptions and preferences of opioid using women is a necessary next step to understanding this phenomenon. A mixed-method study was conducted which included both self-report questionnaires along with a semi-structured qualitative interview of opioid-using pregnant or recently pregnant women in two drug treatment facilities in Ohio. Forty-two women completed the study. The majority of recent (75%) and total pregnancies were unintended. Male condoms were reported as the highest form of lifetime contraception used within the present sample (69%). Participants reported low lifetime use of long acting reversible contraception (LARC) (ranging from 5 to 12%). Participants preferred hormonal injections first (40%), followed by IUDs (17%). Reasons for preferences of injections and LARC were similar: not needing to remember, side effects, and long-term effectiveness. Most of the study population participants stated they would utilize contraception, particularly Tier 1 LARC methods, if freely available; however, high rates of unintended pregnancy were observed in this sample. This indicates the need for contraception education, and addressing the procedural, logistical and economic barriers that may be preventing the use of LARC among this population.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 33 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 27%
Student > Bachelor 4 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Other 2 6%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 6%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 12 36%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 21%
Social Sciences 4 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 9%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 15 45%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 July 2018.
All research outputs
#7,964,191
of 13,221,142 outputs
Outputs from Contraception and Reproductive Medicine
#16
of 30 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#150,797
of 270,592 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Contraception and Reproductive Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,221,142 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 30 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one scored the same or higher as 14 of them.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,592 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them