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The evolution of the Global Burden of Disease framework for disease, injury and risk factor quantification: developing the evidence base for national, regional and global public health action

Overview of attention for article published in Globalization and Health, April 2005
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
12 tweeters
wikipedia
6 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
80 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
138 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
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Title
The evolution of the Global Burden of Disease framework for disease, injury and risk factor quantification: developing the evidence base for national, regional and global public health action
Published in
Globalization and Health, April 2005
DOI 10.1186/1744-8603-1-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alan D Lopez

Abstract

Reliable, comparable information about the main causes of disease and injury in populations, and how these are changing, is a critical input for debates about priorities in the health sector. Traditional sources of information about the descriptive epidemiology of diseases, injuries and risk factors are generally incomplete, fragmented and of uncertain reliability and comparability. Lack of a standardized measurement framework to permit comparisons across diseases and injuries, as well as risk factors, and failure to systematically evaluate data quality have impeded comparative analyses of the true public health importance of various conditions and risk factors. As a consequence the impact of major conditions and hazards on population health has been poorly appreciated, often leading to a lack of public health investment. Global disease and risk factor quantification improved dramatically in the early 1990s with the completion of the first Global Burden of Disease Study. For the first time, the comparative importance of over 100 diseases and injuries, and ten major risk factors, for global and regional health status could be assessed using a common metric (Disability-Adjusted Life Years) which simultaneously accounted for both premature mortality and the prevalence, duration and severity of the non-fatal consequences of disease and injury. As a consequence, mental health conditions and injuries, for which non-fatal outcomes are of particular significance, were identified as being among the leading causes of disease/injury burden worldwide, with clear implications for policy, particularly prevention. A major achievement of the Study was the complete global descriptive epidemiology, including incidence, prevalence and mortality, by age, sex and Region, of over 100 diseases and injuries. National applications, further methodological research and an increase in data availability have led to improved national, regional and global estimates for 2000, but substantial uncertainty around the disease burden caused by major conditions, including, HIV, remains. The rapid implementation of cost-effective data collection systems in developing countries is a key priority if global public policy to promote health is to be more effectively informed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 138 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Ghana 2 1%
Spain 2 1%
Germany 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Malaysia 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 128 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 31 22%
Researcher 27 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 12%
Student > Bachelor 10 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 7%
Other 34 25%
Unknown 10 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 51 37%
Social Sciences 18 13%
Environmental Science 10 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 5%
Other 28 20%
Unknown 15 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 June 2013.
All research outputs
#2,162,513
of 18,404,646 outputs
Outputs from Globalization and Health
#366
of 934 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#13,564
of 123,633 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Globalization and Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,404,646 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 934 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 123,633 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them