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Rates and determinants of early initiation of breastfeeding and exclusive breast feeding at 42 days postnatal in six low and middle-income countries: A prospective cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in Reproductive Health, June 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
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3 Facebook pages

Citations

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79 Dimensions

Readers on

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333 Mendeley
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Title
Rates and determinants of early initiation of breastfeeding and exclusive breast feeding at 42 days postnatal in six low and middle-income countries: A prospective cohort study
Published in
Reproductive Health, June 2015
DOI 10.1186/1742-4755-12-s2-s10
Pubmed ID
Authors

Archana Patel, Sherri Bucher, Yamini Pusdekar, Fabian Esamai, Nancy F Krebs, Shivaprasad S Goudar, Elwyn Chomba, Ana Garces, Omrana Pasha, Sarah Saleem, Bhalachandra S Kodkany, Edward A Liechty, Bhala Kodkany, Richard J Derman, Waldemar A Carlo, K Michael Hambidge, Robert L Goldenberg, Fernando Althabe, Mabel Berrueta, Janet L Moore, Elizabeth M McClure, Marion Koso-Thomas, Patricia L Hibberd

Abstract

Early initiation of breastfeeding after birth and exclusive breastfeeding through six months of age confers many health benefits for infants; both are crucial high impact, low-cost interventions. However, determining accurate global rates of these crucial activities has been challenging. We use population-based data to describe: (1) rates of early initiation of breastfeeding (defined as within 1 hour of birth) and of exclusive breastfeeding at 42 days post-partum; and (2) factors associated with failure to initiate early breastfeeding and exclusive breastfeeding at 42 days post-partum. Prospectively collected data from women and their live-born infants enrolled in the Global Network's Maternal and Newborn Health Registry between January 1, 2010-December 31, 2013 included women-infant dyads in 106 geographic areas (clusters) at 7 research sites in 6 countries (Kenya, Zambia, India [2 sites], Pakistan, Argentina and Guatemala). Rates and risk factors for failure to initiate early breastfeeding were investigated for the entire cohort and rates and risk factors for failure to maintain exclusive breastfeeding was assessed in a sub-sample studied at 42 days post-partum. A total of 255,495 live-born women-infant dyads were included in the study. Rates and determinants for the exclusive breastfeeding sub-study at 42 days post-partum were assessed from among a sub-sample of 105,563 subjects. Although there was heterogeneity by site, and early initiation of breastfeeding after delivery was high, the Pakistan site had the lowest rates of early initiation of breastfeeding. The Pakistan site also had the highest rate of lack of exclusive breastfeeding at 42 days post-partum. Across all regions, factors associated with failure to initiate early breastfeeding included nulliparity, caesarean section, low birth weight, resuscitation with bag and mask, and failure to place baby on the mother's chest after delivery. Factors associated with failure to achieve exclusive breastfeeding at 42 days varied across the sites. The only factor significant in all sites was multiple gestation. In this large, prospective, population-based, observational study, rates of both early initiation of breastfeeding and exclusive breastfeeding at 42 days post-partum were high, except in Pakistan. Factors associated with these key breastfeeding indicators should assist with more effective strategies to scale-up these crucial public health interventions. Registration at the Clinicaltrials.gov website (ID# NCT01073475).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 333 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Indonesia 1 <1%
Unknown 332 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 78 23%
Student > Bachelor 38 11%
Student > Postgraduate 33 10%
Researcher 27 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 8%
Other 61 18%
Unknown 71 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 99 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 89 27%
Social Sciences 19 6%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 2%
Unspecified 4 1%
Other 23 7%
Unknown 91 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 July 2015.
All research outputs
#6,359,396
of 12,440,542 outputs
Outputs from Reproductive Health
#489
of 784 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#68,340
of 198,096 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Reproductive Health
#10
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,440,542 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 784 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.5. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 198,096 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.