↓ Skip to main content

Control of Caenorhabditis elegans germ-line stem-cell cycling speed meets requirements of design to minimize mutation accumulation

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Biology, July 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
30 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Control of Caenorhabditis elegans germ-line stem-cell cycling speed meets requirements of design to minimize mutation accumulation
Published in
BMC Biology, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12915-015-0148-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michael Chiang, Amanda Cinquin, Adrian Paz, Edward Meeds, Christopher A. Price, Max Welling, Olivier Cinquin

Abstract

Stem cells are thought to play a critical role in minimizing the accumulation of mutations, but it is not clear which strategies they follow to fulfill that performance objective. Slow cycling of stem cells provides a simple strategy that can minimize cell pedigree depth and thereby minimize the accumulation of replication-dependent mutations. Although the power of this strategy was recognized early on, a quantitative assessment of whether and how it is employed by biological systems is missing. Here we address this problem using a simple self-renewing organ - the C. elegans gonad - whose overall organization is shared with many self-renewing organs. Computational simulations of mutation accumulation characterize a tradeoff between fast development and low mutation accumulation, and show that slow-cycling stem cells allow for an advantageous compromise to be reached. This compromise is such that worm germline stem cells should cycle more slowly than their differentiating counterparts, but only by a modest amount. Experimental measurements of cell cycle lengths derived using a new, quantitative technique are consistent with these predictions. Our findings shed light both on design principles that underlie the role of stem cells in delaying aging, and on evolutionary forces that shape stem cell gene regulatory networks.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Belgium 1 3%
Unknown 29 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 47%
Student > Master 5 17%
Other 2 7%
Student > Bachelor 2 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 7%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 2 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 30%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 3%
Mathematics 1 3%
Computer Science 1 3%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 4 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 March 2016.
All research outputs
#13,441,810
of 22,817,213 outputs
Outputs from BMC Biology
#1,569
of 1,995 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#124,048
of 263,985 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Biology
#23
of 34 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,817,213 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,995 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.5. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,985 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 34 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.