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Associations between loneliness and perceived social support and outcomes of mental health problems: a systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, May 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#28 of 3,778)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
8 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
policy
2 policy sources
twitter
131 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
166 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
448 Mendeley
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Title
Associations between loneliness and perceived social support and outcomes of mental health problems: a systematic review
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12888-018-1736-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jingyi Wang, Farhana Mann, Brynmor Lloyd-Evans, Ruimin Ma, Sonia Johnson

Abstract

The adverse effects of loneliness and of poor perceived social support on physical health and mortality are established, but no systematic synthesis is available of their relationship with the outcomes of mental health problems over time. In this systematic review, we aim to examine the evidence on whether loneliness and closely related concepts predict poor outcomes among adults with mental health problems. We searched six databases and reference lists for longitudinal quantitative studies that examined the relationship between baseline measures of loneliness and poor perceived social support and outcomes at follow up. Thirty-four eligible papers were retrieved. Due to heterogeneity among included studies in clinical populations, predictor measures and outcomes, a narrative synthesis was conducted. We found substantial evidence from prospective studies that people with depression who perceive their social support as poorer have worse outcomes in terms of symptoms, recovery and social functioning. Loneliness has been investigated much less than perceived social support, but there is some evidence that greater loneliness predicts poorer depression outcome. There is also some preliminary evidence of associations between perceived social support and outcomes in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and anxiety disorders. Loneliness and quality of social support in depression are potential targets for development and testing of interventions, while for other conditions further evidence is needed regarding relationships with outcomes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 131 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 448 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 448 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 74 17%
Student > Master 65 15%
Student > Bachelor 64 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 40 9%
Researcher 36 8%
Other 78 17%
Unknown 91 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 146 33%
Medicine and Dentistry 54 12%
Social Sciences 44 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 33 7%
Neuroscience 9 2%
Other 42 9%
Unknown 120 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 175. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 January 2021.
All research outputs
#125,997
of 17,504,055 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#28
of 3,778 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,094
of 288,435 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,504,055 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,778 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 288,435 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them