↓ Skip to main content

Identification of urinary metabolites that correlate with clinical improvements in children with autism treated with sulforaphane from broccoli

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Autism, May 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#15 of 650)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
293 tweeters
facebook
6 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
51 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
185 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Identification of urinary metabolites that correlate with clinical improvements in children with autism treated with sulforaphane from broccoli
Published in
Molecular Autism, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13229-018-0218-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stephen Bent, Brittany Lawton, Tracy Warren, Felicia Widjaja, Katherine Dang, Jed W. Fahey, Brian Cornblatt, Jason M. Kinchen, Kevin Delucchi, Robert L. Hendren

Abstract

Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have urinary metabolites suggesting impairments in several pathways, including oxidative stress, inflammation, mitochondrial dysfunction, and gut microbiome alterations. Sulforaphane, a supplement with indirect antioxidant effects that are derived from broccoli sprouts and seeds, was recently shown to lead to improvements in behavior and social responsiveness in children with ASD. We conducted the current open-label study to determine if we could identify changes in urinary metabolites that were associated with clinical improvements with the goal of identifying a potential mechanism of action. Children and young adults enrolled in a school for children with ASD and related neurodevelopmental disorders were recruited to participate in a 12-week, open-label study of sulforaphane. Fasting urinary metabolites and measures of behavior (Aberrant Behavior Checklist-ABC) and social responsiveness (Social Responsiveness Scale-SRS) were measured at baseline and at the end of the study. Pearson's correlation coefficient was calculated for the pre- to post-intervention change in each of the two clinical scales (ABS and SRS) versus the change in each metabolite. Fifteen children completed the 12-week study. Mean scores on both symptom measures showed improvements (decreases) over the study period, but only the change in the SRS was significant. The ABC improved - 7.1 points (95% CI - 17.4 to 3.2), and the SRS improved - 9.7 points (95% CI - 18.7 to - 0.8). We identified 77 urinary metabolites that were correlated with changes in symptoms, and they clustered into pathways of oxidative stress, amino acid/gut microbiome, neurotransmitters, hormones, and sphingomyelin metabolism. Urinary metabolomics analysis is a useful tool to identify pathways that may be involved in the mechanism of action of treatments targeting abnormal physiology in ASD. This study was prospectively registered at clinicaltrials.gov (NCT02654743) on January 11, 2016.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 293 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 185 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 185 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 31 17%
Researcher 26 14%
Student > Bachelor 24 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 8%
Other 12 6%
Other 29 16%
Unknown 49 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 36 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 7%
Psychology 12 6%
Neuroscience 11 6%
Other 39 21%
Unknown 61 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 242. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 December 2019.
All research outputs
#114,157
of 21,666,161 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Autism
#15
of 650 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,007
of 300,650 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Autism
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,666,161 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 650 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 28.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 300,650 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them