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Dose and time responses of vitamin D biomarkers to monthly vitamin D3 supplementation in overweight/obese African Americans with suboptimal vitamin d status: a placebo controlled randomized clinical…

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Obesity, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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35 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Dose and time responses of vitamin D biomarkers to monthly vitamin D3 supplementation in overweight/obese African Americans with suboptimal vitamin d status: a placebo controlled randomized clinical trial
Published in
BMC Obesity, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40608-015-0056-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jigar Bhagatwala, Haidong Zhu, Samip J. Parikh, De-Huang Guo, Ishita Kotak, Ying Huang, Robyn Havens, Michael Pham, Eric Afari, Susan Kim, Christopher Cutler, Norman K. Pollock, Yutong Dong, Anas Raed, Yanbin Dong

Abstract

A critical need exists to better understand the physiological sequel of vitamin D supplementation in obese individuals and African Americans. The aim was to comprehensively evaluate dose- and time-responses of a panel of vitamin D biomarkers to vitamin D supplements in this population. We conducted a 16-week randomized, double-blinded, and placebo-controlled clinical trial. Seventy overweight/obese African Americans (age 13-45 years, 84 % females) with 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations ≤20 ng/mL were randomly assigned to receive a supervised monthly oral vitamin D3 of 18,000 IU (~600 IU/day, n = 17), 60,000 IU (~2000 IU/day, n = 18), 120,000 IU (~4000 IU/day, n = 18), or placebo (n = 17). There were significant dose- and time-responses of circulating 25(OH)D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D], and intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), but not fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23), phosphorus and urine calcium to the vitamin D supplements. The mean 25(OH)D concentrations in the 2000 IU and 4000 IU groups reached ≥30 ng/mL as early as 8-weeks and remained at similar level at 16-weeks. The increase of 25(OH)D was significantly higher in the 4000 IU group than all the other groups at 8-weeks. The increase of 1,25(OH)2D was significantly higher in the 2000 IU and 4000 IU groups than the placebo at 8-weeks. Only the 4000 IU compared to the placebo significantly reduced iPTH at 8- and 16-weeks. Our RCT, for the first time, comprehensively evaluated time- and dose- responses of vitamin D supplementation in overweight/obese African Americans with suboptimal vitamin D status. Circulating 25(OH)D, 1,25(OH)2D, and iPTH, but not FGF-23, phosphorus and urine calcium, respond to vitamin D supplementation in a time- and dose-response manner. By monthly dosing, 2000 IU appears to be sufficient in achieving a 25(OH)D level of 30 ng/mL in this population. However, importantly, 4000 IU, rather than 2000 IU, seems to suppress iPTH. If replicated, these data might be informative in optimizing vitamin D status and providing individualized dosing recommendation in overweight/obese African Americans. ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT01583621, Registered on April 3, 2012.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 35 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 8 23%
Student > Master 6 17%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 11%
Student > Postgraduate 3 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 9%
Other 6 17%
Unknown 5 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 6%
Social Sciences 2 6%
Other 5 14%
Unknown 8 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 August 2015.
All research outputs
#6,350,563
of 11,340,041 outputs
Outputs from BMC Obesity
#87
of 143 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#100,816
of 235,504 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Obesity
#4
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,340,041 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 143 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.4. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 235,504 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.