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Electrical injury – a dual center analysis of patient characteristics, therapeutic specifics and outcome predictors

Overview of attention for article published in Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, May 2018
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Title
Electrical injury – a dual center analysis of patient characteristics, therapeutic specifics and outcome predictors
Published in
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13049-018-0513-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jochen Gille, Thomas Schmidt, Adrian Dragu, Dimitri Emich, Peter Hilbert-Carius, Thomas Kremer, Thomas Raff, Beate Reichelt, Apostolos Siafliakis, Frank Siemers, Michael Steen, Manuel F. Struck

Abstract

Electrical injuries represent life-threatening emergencies. Evidence on differences between high (HVI) and low voltage injuries (LVI) regarding characteristics at presentation, rhabdomyolysis markers, surgical and intensive burn care and outcomes is scarce. Consecutive patients admitted to two burn centers for electrical injuries over an 18-year period (1998-2015) were evaluated. Analysis included comparisons of HVI vs. LVI regarding demographic data, diagnostic and treatment specific variables, particularly serum creatinine kinase (CK) and myoglobin levels over the course of 4 post injury days (PID), and outcomes. Of 4075 patients, 162 patients (3.9%) with electrical injury were analyzed. A total of 82 patients (50.6%) were observed with HVI. These patients were younger, had considerably higher morbidity and mortality, and required more extensive burn surgery and more complex burn intensive care than patients with LVI. Admission CK and myoglobin levels correlated significantly with HVI, burn size, ventilator days, surgical interventions, amputation, flap surgery, renal replacement therapy, sepsis, and mortality. The highest serum levels were observed at PID 1 (myoglobin) and PID 2 (CK). In 23 patients (14.2%), cardiac arrhythmias were observed; only 4 of these arrhythmias occurred after hospital admission. The independent predictors of mortality were ventilator days (OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.06-1.51, p = 0.009), number of surgical interventions (OR 0.47, 95% CI 0.27-0.834, p = 0.010) and limb amputations (OR 14.26, 95% CI 1.26-162.1, p = 0.032). Patients with electrical injuries, HVI in particular, are at high risk for severe complications. Due to the need for highly specialized surgery and intensive care, treatment should be reserved to burn units. Serum myoglobin and CK levels reflect the severity of injury and may predict a more complex clinical course. Routine cardiac monitoring > 24 h post injury does not seem to be necessary.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 48 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 17%
Other 5 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 10%
Professor 4 8%
Student > Bachelor 3 6%
Other 9 19%
Unknown 14 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 26 54%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 8%
Environmental Science 1 2%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 2%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 15 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 June 2018.
All research outputs
#8,176,560
of 13,040,510 outputs
Outputs from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#634
of 831 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#162,102
of 271,771 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,040,510 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 831 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.3. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,771 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them