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Footwear choices for painful feet – an observational study exploring footwear and foot problems in women

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, May 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#11 of 786)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
7 news outlets
twitter
27 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
22 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
88 Mendeley
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Title
Footwear choices for painful feet – an observational study exploring footwear and foot problems in women
Published in
Journal of Foot and Ankle Research, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13047-018-0265-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Moira McRitchie, Helen Branthwaite, Nachiappan Chockalingam

Abstract

A high percentage of the population report footwear related foot pain, yet there is limited research on the effect footwear has on the development of this pain. The aim of this study was to establish whether footwear purchased by patients have an association with foot pain and what choices determined a purchase decision. Shape and size measurements of the dominant foot and footwear (length and width) were taken from 67 female participants who routinely received podiatric treatment. Participants were also asked to complete a short questionnaire to rate the shoe characteristics, emotions whilst wearing and reasons for the purchase. Results highlighted a high prevalence of structural foot pathology for those over 61 who preferred slip on shoes. This group also wore shoes that were significantly narrower than their feet with width difference correlating to the presence of Hallux Abductovarus (HAV). In addition, results indicate that individual footwear advice is more important than previously thought, as it is clear that choice of footwear worn to podiatry appointments are not always worn on a daily basis. This study emphasises that the width of the shoe is an important part of fit, highlighting the need for patient specific footwear assessment and education for behaviour changes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 27 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 88 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 88 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 14%
Student > Bachelor 12 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 8%
Other 4 5%
Unspecified 4 5%
Other 17 19%
Unknown 32 36%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 21 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 11%
Engineering 5 6%
Sports and Recreations 5 6%
Unspecified 4 5%
Other 7 8%
Unknown 36 41%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 78. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 July 2022.
All research outputs
#465,087
of 22,889,074 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Foot and Ankle Research
#11
of 786 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,741
of 330,450 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Foot and Ankle Research
#2
of 26 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,889,074 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 786 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 330,450 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 26 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.