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Serologic features of cohorts with variable genetic risk for systemic lupus erythematosus

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Medicine, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#3 of 894)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
49 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
5 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

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31 Mendeley
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Title
Serologic features of cohorts with variable genetic risk for systemic lupus erythematosus
Published in
Molecular Medicine, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s10020-018-0019-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jyotsna Bhattacharya, Karalyn Pappas, Bahtiyar Toz, Cynthia Aranow, Meggan Mackay, Peter K. Gregersen, Ogobara Doumbo, Abdel Kader Traore, Martin L. Lesser, Maureen McMahon, Tammy Utset, Earl Silverman, Deborah Levy, William J. McCune, Meenakshi Jolly, Daniel Wallace, Michael Weisman, Juanita Romero-Diaz, Betty Diamond

Abstract

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease with genetic, hormonal, and environmental influences. In Western Europe and North America, individuals of West African descent have a 3-4 fold greater incidence of SLE than Caucasians. Paradoxically, West Africans in sub-Saharan Africa appear to have a low incidence of SLE, and some studies suggest a milder disease with less nephritis. In this study, we analyzed sera from African American female SLE patients and four other cohorts, one with SLE and others with varying degrees of risk for SLE in order to identify serologic factors that might correlate with risk of or protection against SLE. Our cohorts included West African women with previous malaria infection assumed to be protected from development of SLE, clinically unaffected sisters of SLE patients with high risk of developing SLE, healthy African American women with intermediate risk, healthy Caucasian women with low risk of developing SLE, and women with a diagnosis of SLE. We developed a lupus risk index (LRI) based on titers of IgM and IgG anti-double stranded DNA antibodies and levels of C1q. The risk index was highest in SLE patients; second highest in unaffected sisters of SLE patients; third highest in healthy African-American women and lowest in healthy Caucasian women and malaria-exposed West African women. This risk index may be useful in early interventions to prevent SLE. In addition, it suggests new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of SLE.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 13%
Student > Bachelor 4 13%
Student > Master 3 10%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 2 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Other 7 23%
Unknown 9 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 6%
Social Sciences 2 6%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 10 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 400. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 June 2018.
All research outputs
#40,589
of 17,522,710 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Medicine
#3
of 894 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,400
of 288,119 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,522,710 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 894 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 288,119 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them