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The role of interleukin-1 beta in the pathophysiology of Schnitzler’s syndrome

Overview of attention for article published in Arthritis Research & Therapy, July 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

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1 Google+ user

Citations

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Title
The role of interleukin-1 beta in the pathophysiology of Schnitzler’s syndrome
Published in
Arthritis Research & Therapy, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13075-015-0696-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Heleen D. de Koning, Joost Schalkwijk, Monique Stoffels, Johanna Jongekrijg, Joannes F. M. Jacobs, Eugène Verwiel, Hans J. P. M. Koenen, Frank Preijers, Dirk Holzinger, Irma Joosten, Jos W. M. van der Meer, Anna Simon

Abstract

Schnitzler's syndrome (SchS) is a disabling autoinflammatory disorder, characterized by a chronic urticarial rash, an M-protein, arthralgia, and other signs of systemic inflammation. Anti-interleukin-1 (IL-1) beta antibodies are highly effective, but the pathophysiology is still largely unknown. Here we studied the effect of in-vivo IL-1 inhibition on serum markers of inflammation and cellular immune responses. Eight patients with SchS received monthly subcutaneous (s.c.) injections with 150 mg canakinumab for six months. Blood was drawn for measurement of serum markers of inflammation (12 times per patient) and for functional and phenotypic analysis of both freshly isolated and toll-like receptor (TLR)-ligand-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) (five times per patient). All data were compared to results of healthy controls. IL-6 levels in serum and in lysates of freshly isolated PBMCs and serum myeloid-related protein (MRP8)/14 and S100A12 levels correlated with disease activity. In vitro, LPS stimulation resulted in higher IL-6 and IL-1 beta production in PBMCs from symptomatic SchS patients compared to healthy controls, whereas patient cells were relatively hyporesponsive to poly:IC and Pam3Cys. The mRNA microarray of PBMCs showed distinct transcriptomes for controls, symptomatic patients and anti-IL-1-treated patients. Numbers of T- and B-cell subsets as well as M-protein concentrations were not affected by IL-1 inhibition. Free light chain levels were elevated in 4 out of 8 patients. In conclusion, patient PBMCs are hyperresponsive to LPS, and clinical efficacy of IL-1 beta inhibition in patients with SchS is associated with in-vivo and ex-vivo suppression of inflammation. Interestingly, patient PBMCs showed divergent responses to TLR2/6, TLR3 and TLR4 ligands. Our data underscore that IL-1 beta plays a pivotal role in SchS.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 3%
Unknown 35 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 25%
Student > Master 5 14%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 11%
Other 3 8%
Other 7 19%
Unknown 4 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 42%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 6%
Computer Science 2 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 6%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 6 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 July 2015.
All research outputs
#6,492,011
of 12,013,724 outputs
Outputs from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#1,057
of 1,899 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#95,338
of 237,842 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#32
of 73 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,013,724 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,899 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.7. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 237,842 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 73 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.