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Multilocus microsatellite typing of Leishmania infantum isolates in monitored Leishmania/HIV coinfected patients

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, July 2015
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26 Mendeley
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Title
Multilocus microsatellite typing of Leishmania infantum isolates in monitored Leishmania/HIV coinfected patients
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13071-015-0989-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Míriam Tomás-Pérez, Mallorie Hide, Cristina Riera, Liliana Montoya, Anne-Laure Bañuls, Esteve Ribera, Montserrat Portús, Roser Fisa

Abstract

Leishmania infantum is the main etiological agent of both visceral and cutaneous clinical forms of leishmaniasis in the Mediterranean area. Leishmania/HIV coinfection in this area is characterized by a chronic course and frequent recurrences of clinical episodes. The present study using Multilocus Microsatellite Typing (MLMT) analysis, a highly discriminative tool, aimed to genetically characterize L. infantum isolates taken from monitored Leishmania/HIV coinfected patients presenting successive clinical episodes. In this study, by the analysis of 20 microsatellite loci, we studied the MLMT profiles of 25 L. infantum isolates from 8 Leishmania/HIV coinfected patients who had experienced several clinical episodes. Two to seven isolates per patient were taken before and after treatment, during clinical and non-clinical episodes, with time intervals of 6 days to 29 months. Genetic diversity, clustering and phenetic analyses were performed. MLMT enabled us to study the genetic characteristics of the 25 L. infantum isolates, differentiating 18 genotypes, corresponding to a genotypic diversity of 0.72. Fifteen genotypes were unique in the total sample set and only 3 were repeated, 2 of which were detected in different patients. Both clustering and phylogenetic analyses provided insights into the genetic links between the isolates; in five patients isolates showed clear genetic links: either the genotype was exactly the same or only slightly different. In contrast, the isolates of the other three patients were dispersed in different clusters and some could be the result of mixing between populations. Our data indicated a great MLMT variability between isolates from coinfected patients and no predominant genotype was observed. Despite this, almost all clinical episodes could be interpreted as a relapse rather than a reinfection. The results showed that diverse factors like an intrapatient evolution over time or culture bias could influence the parasite population detected in the patient, making it difficult to differentiate between relapse and reinfection.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 2 8%
Brazil 1 4%
Unknown 23 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 12%
Student > Bachelor 2 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 8%
Student > Master 2 8%
Other 4 15%
Unknown 7 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 19%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 15%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 8%
Mathematics 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 9 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 September 2015.
All research outputs
#2,952,513
of 5,579,069 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#960
of 1,759 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#105,816
of 193,064 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#54
of 105 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,579,069 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,759 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 105 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.