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The difficult conversation: a qualitative evaluation of the ‘Eat Well Move More’ family weight management service

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, May 2018
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Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
93 Mendeley
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2 CiteULike
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Title
The difficult conversation: a qualitative evaluation of the ‘Eat Well Move More’ family weight management service
Published in
BMC Research Notes, May 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13104-018-3428-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rebecca E. Johnson, Oyinlola Oyebode, Sadie Walker, Elizabeth Knowles, Wendy Robertson

Abstract

The Eat Well Move More (EWMM) family and child weight management service is a 12-week intervention integrating healthy eating and physical activity education and activities for families and children aged 4-16. EWMM service providers identified low uptake 12 months prior to the evaluation. The aims of this study were to describe referral practices and pathways into the service to identify potential reasons for low referral and uptake rates. We conducted interviews and focus groups with general practitioners (GPs) (n = 4), school nurses, and nursing assistants (n = 12). Data were analysed using thematic analysis. School nurses highlighted three main barriers to making a referral: parent engagement, child autonomy, and concerns over the National Child Measurement Programme letter. GPs highlighted that addressing obesity among children is a 'difficult conversation' with several complex issues related to and sustaining that difficulty. In conclusion, referral into weight management services in the community may persistently lag if a larger and more complex tangle of barriers lie at the point of school nurse and GP decision-making. The national prevalence of, and factors associated with this hesitation to discuss weight management issues with parents and children remains largely unknown.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 93 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 93 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 19 20%
Student > Bachelor 13 14%
Student > Master 13 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 8%
Other 10 11%
Unknown 23 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 21 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 12%
Social Sciences 8 9%
Sports and Recreations 7 8%
Psychology 5 5%
Other 14 15%
Unknown 27 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 October 2018.
All research outputs
#8,155,889
of 13,644,952 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#1,397
of 3,103 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#150,497
of 271,816 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,644,952 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,103 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,816 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them