↓ Skip to main content

A case of mantle cell lymphoma presenting as IgG4-related dacryoadenitis and sialoadenitis, so-called Mikulicz’s disease

Overview of attention for article published in World Journal of Surgical Oncology, July 2015
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
23 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
A case of mantle cell lymphoma presenting as IgG4-related dacryoadenitis and sialoadenitis, so-called Mikulicz’s disease
Published in
World Journal of Surgical Oncology, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12957-015-0644-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yoshikazu Hayashi, Masafumi Moriyama, Takashi Maehara, Yuichi Goto, Shintaro Kawano, Miho Ohta, Akihiko Tanaka, Sachiko Furukawa, Jun-Nosuke Hayashida, Tamotsu Kiyoshima, Mayumi Shimizu, Toru Chikui, Seiji Nakamura

Abstract

Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a relatively uncommon type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. It develops in the outer edge of a lymph node called the mantle zone. In contrast, IgG4-related dacryoadenitis and sialoadenitis (IgG4-DS) is characterized by elevated serum IgG4 and persistent bilateral enlargement of lacrimal glands (LGs) and salivary glands (SGs), with infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells. Recent studies indicated the importance of differentiation between IgG4-DS and malignant lymphoma. An 82-year-old man was suspected of IgG4-DS because of a high serum IgG level (2174 mg/dL) and bilateral swelling of LGs and SGs. Lip biopsy and fine needle biopsy of submandibular gland were performed, and subsequently, MCL was diagnosed through the histopathological findings. MCL most commonly occurs in the Waldeyer ring, but rarely in the stomach, spleen, skin, LG, and SG. We report an unusual case of MCL involving LGs and SGs mimicking IgG4-DS, which suggests that IgG4 testing may be useful in the differentiation of IgG4-DS in the presence of bilateral swelling of LGs or SGs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 5 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 9%
Student > Postgraduate 2 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 9%
Student > Bachelor 1 4%
Other 4 17%
Unknown 7 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 43%
Neuroscience 1 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Unknown 11 48%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 July 2015.
All research outputs
#3,798,426
of 5,398,122 outputs
Outputs from World Journal of Surgical Oncology
#564
of 1,146 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#131,246
of 189,130 outputs
Outputs of similar age from World Journal of Surgical Oncology
#38
of 63 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,398,122 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,146 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.3. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 189,130 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 63 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 4th percentile – i.e., 4% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.