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Trichuris suis induces human non-classical patrolling monocytes via the mannose receptor and PKC: implications for multiple sclerosis

Overview of attention for article published in Acta Neuropathologica Communications, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

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60 Mendeley
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Title
Trichuris suis induces human non-classical patrolling monocytes via the mannose receptor and PKC: implications for multiple sclerosis
Published in
Acta Neuropathologica Communications, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40478-015-0223-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gijs Kooij, Rens Braster, Jasper J. Koning, Lisa C. Laan, Sandra J. van Vliet, Tamara Los, Anne Marieke Eveleens, Susanne M. A. van der Pol, Elisabeth Förster-Waldl, Kaan Boztug, Alexandre Belot, Katka Szilagyi, Timo K. van den Berg, Jaap D. van Buul, Marjolein van Egmond, Helga E. de Vries, Richard D. Cummings, Christine D. Dijkstra, Irma van Die

Abstract

The inverse correlation between prevalence of auto-immune disorders like the chronic neuro-inflammatory disease multiple sclerosis (MS) and the occurrence of helminth (worm) infections, suggests that the helminth-trained immune system is protective against auto-immunity. As monocytes are regarded as crucial players in the pathogenesis of auto-immune diseases, we explored the hypothesis that these innate effector cells are prime targets for helminths to exert their immunomodulatory effects. Here we show that soluble products of the porcine nematode Trichuris suis (TsSP) are potent in changing the phenotype and function of human monocytes by skewing classical monocytes into anti-inflammatory patrolling cells, which exhibit reduced trans-endothelial migration capacity in an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier. Mechanistically, we identified the mannose receptor as the TsSP-interacting monocyte receptor and we revealed that specific downstream signalling occurs via protein kinase C (PKC), and in particular PKCδ. This study provides comprehensive mechanistic insight into helminth-induced immunomodulation, which can be therapeutically exploited to combat various auto-immune disorders.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 60 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 60 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 22%
Researcher 8 13%
Student > Bachelor 8 13%
Other 4 7%
Student > Master 4 7%
Other 13 22%
Unknown 10 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Immunology and Microbiology 11 18%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 12%
Neuroscience 4 7%
Other 10 17%
Unknown 12 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 April 2016.
All research outputs
#1,497,209
of 7,588,328 outputs
Outputs from Acta Neuropathologica Communications
#163
of 354 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#53,966
of 226,635 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Acta Neuropathologica Communications
#12
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,588,328 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 354 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 226,635 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.