↓ Skip to main content

CDH1 and IL1-beta expression dictates FAK and MAPKK-dependent cross-talk between cancer cells and human mesenchymal stem cells

Overview of attention for article published in Stem Cell Research & Therapy, July 2015
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (55th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
25 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
41 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
CDH1 and IL1-beta expression dictates FAK and MAPKK-dependent cross-talk between cancer cells and human mesenchymal stem cells
Published in
Stem Cell Research & Therapy, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13287-015-0123-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mashael Al-toub, Radhakrishnan Vishnubalaji, Rimi Hamam, Moustapha Kassem, Abdullah Aldahmash, Nehad M. Alajez

Abstract

Tumor microenvironment conferred by stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (MSCs) plays a key role in tumor development, progression, and response to therapy. Defining the role of MSCs in tumorigenesis is crucial for their safe utilization in regenerative medicine. Herein, we conducted comprehensive investigation of the cross-talk between human MSCs (hMSCs) and 12 cancer cell lines derived from breast, prostate, colon, head/neck and skin. Human bone marrow-derived MSC line expressing green fluorescence protein (GFP) (hMSC-GFP) were co-cultured with the following cancer cell lines: (MCF7, BT-20, BT-474, MDA-MB-468, T-47D, SK-BR-3, MDA-MB-231, PC-3, HT-29, MDA-MB-435 s, and FaDu) and changes in their morphology were assessed using fluorescent microscopy. For cellular tracking, cells were labeled with Vybrant DiO, DiL, and DiD lipophilic dyes. Time-lapse microscopy was conducted using Nikon BioStation IM-Q. Stable expression of mCherry, and luciferase genes was achieved using lentiviral technology. IL1-Beta neutralizing experiments were conducted using soluble recombinant IL-1R (srIL-1R). Changes in gene expression in sorted hMSCs were assessed using Agilent microarray platform while data normalization and bioinformatics were conducted using GeneSpring software. We observed a dynamic interaction between cancer cells and hMSCs. High CDH1 (E-cadherin) and low IL1-Beta expression by cancer cells promoted reorganization of hMSCs into a niche-like formation, which was dependent on direct cell-cell contact. Our data also revealed transfer of cellular components between cancer cells and hMSCs as one possible mechanism for intercellular communication. Global gene expression analysis of sorted hMSCs following co-culturing with MCF7 and BT-20 cells revealed enrichment in signaling pathways related to bone formation, FAK and MAPKK signaling. Co-culturing hMSCs with MCF7 cells increased their growth evidenced by increase in Ki67 and PCNA staining in tumor cells in direct contact with hMSCs niche. On the other hand, co-culturing hMSCs with FaDu, HT-29 or MDA-MB-231 cells led remarkable decline in their cell growth. Dynamic interaction exists between hMSCs and cancer cells. CDH1 and IL1-Beta expression by cancer cells mediates the crosstalk between hMSCs and cancer cells. We propose a model where hMSCs act as the first line of defense against cancer cell growth and spread.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Sweden 1 2%
Unknown 39 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 27%
Researcher 8 20%
Student > Master 6 15%
Student > Bachelor 4 10%
Other 2 5%
Other 6 15%
Unknown 4 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 17%
Engineering 3 7%
Psychology 1 2%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 8 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 July 2016.
All research outputs
#3,796,405
of 8,083,793 outputs
Outputs from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#323
of 652 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#100,692
of 229,317 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#17
of 45 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,083,793 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 50th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 652 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 229,317 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 45 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.