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Determinants of illness-specific social support and its relation to distress in long-term melanoma survivors

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, April 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

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39 Mendeley
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Title
Determinants of illness-specific social support and its relation to distress in long-term melanoma survivors
Published in
BMC Public Health, April 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5401-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sabine Fischbeck, Veronika Weyer-Elberich, Sylke R. Zeissig, Barbara H. Imruck, Maria Blettner, Harald Binder, Manfred E. Beutel

Abstract

Social support is considered to be one of the most important resources for coping with cancer. However, social interactions may also be detrimental, e. g. disappointing or discouraging. The present study explored: 1. the extent of illness-specific positive aspects of social support and detrimental interactions in melanoma survivors, 2. their relationships to mental health characteristics (e. g. distress, quality of life, fatigue, coping processes, and dispositional optimism) and 3. Combinations of positive social support and detrimental interactions in relation to depression and anxiety. Based on the cancer registry of Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany, melanoma patients diagnosed at least 5 years before the survey were contacted by their physicians. N = 689 melanoma patients filled out the Illness-specific Social Support Scale ISSS (German version) and standardised instruments measuring potential psychosocial determinants of social support. Using principal component analysis, the two factor structure of the ISSS could be reproduced with acceptable reliability; subscales were "Positive Support" (PS) and "Detrimental Interactions" (DI); Cronbach's α = .95/.72. PS was rated higher than DI. Multivariable linear regressions identified different associations with psychosocial determinants. Survivors living in a partnership and those actively seeking out support had a higher probability of receiving PS, but not DI. PS and DI interacted regarding their association with distress: Survivors reporting high DI but low PS were the most depressed and anxious. High DI was partly buffered by PS. When DI was low, high or low PS made no difference regarding distress. Psycho-oncologic interventions should take into account both positive and negative aspects of support in order to promote coping with the disease.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 39 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 6 15%
Student > Bachelor 5 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 13%
Student > Postgraduate 2 5%
Lecturer 2 5%
Other 7 18%
Unknown 12 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 10 26%
Psychology 9 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 8%
Computer Science 1 3%
Social Sciences 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 14 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 June 2018.
All research outputs
#2,076,855
of 13,040,510 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#2,506
of 8,932 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#66,895
of 271,354 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,040,510 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,932 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,354 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them