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Bowel symptoms and self-care strategies of survivors in the process of restoration after low anterior resection of rectal cancer

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Surgery, June 2018
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1 tweeter

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

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65 Mendeley
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Title
Bowel symptoms and self-care strategies of survivors in the process of restoration after low anterior resection of rectal cancer
Published in
BMC Surgery, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12893-018-0368-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lishi Yin, Ling Fan, Renfu Tan, Guangjing Yang, Fenglin Jiang, Chao Zhang, Jun Ma, Yang Yan, Yanhong Zou, Yaowen Zhang, Yamei Wang, Guifang Zhang

Abstract

The purpose of this research is to identify the bowel symptoms and self-care strategies for rectal cancer survivors during the recovery process following low anterior resection surgery. A total of 100 participants were investigated under the structured interview guide based on the dimensions of "symptom management theory". 92% of participants reported changes in bowel habits, the most common being the frequent bowel movements and narrower stools, which we named it finger-shaped consistency stools. The 6 most frequently reported bowel symptoms were excessive flatus (93%), clustering (86%), urgency (77%), straining (62%), bowel frequency (57%) and anal pendant expansion (53%). Periodic bowel movements occurred in 19% participants. For a group of 79 participants at 6 to 24 months post-operation, 86.1% reported a significant improvement of bowel symptoms. Among 68 participants of this subgroup with significant improvements, 70.5% participants reported the length of time it took was at least 6 months. Self-care strategies adopted by participants included diet, bowel medications, practice management and exercise. It is necessary to educate patients on the symptoms experienced following low anterior resection surgery. Through the process of trial and error, participants have acquired self-care strategies. Healthcare professionals should learn knowledge of such strategies and help them build effective interventions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 65 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 13 20%
Researcher 6 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 9%
Other 5 8%
Student > Postgraduate 4 6%
Other 10 15%
Unknown 21 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 18 28%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 23%
Arts and Humanities 2 3%
Sports and Recreations 2 3%
Psychology 2 3%
Other 3 5%
Unknown 23 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 June 2018.
All research outputs
#10,399,168
of 13,040,510 outputs
Outputs from BMC Surgery
#297
of 502 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#203,287
of 271,355 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Surgery
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,040,510 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 502 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.3. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,355 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them