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Laboratory testing and phylogenetic analysis during a mumps outbreak in Ontario, Canada

Overview of attention for article published in Virology Journal, June 2018
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Title
Laboratory testing and phylogenetic analysis during a mumps outbreak in Ontario, Canada
Published in
Virology Journal, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12985-018-0996-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Arnaud G. L’Huillier, Alireza Eshaghi, C. Sarai Racey, Katherene Ogbulafor, Ernesto Lombos, Rachel R. Higgins, David C. Alexander, Erik Kristjanson, Jocelyn Maregmen, Jonathan B. Gubbay, Tony Mazzulli

Abstract

In September 2009, a mumps outbreak originated in New York and spread to Northeastern USA and Canada. This study compares the performance of different diagnostic testing methods used in Ontario and describes molecular characteristics of the outbreak strain. Between September 2009 and February 2010, specimens from suspect cases were submitted to Public Health Ontario Laboratory for mumps serology, culture and/or real-time reverse-transcriptase PCR (rRT-PCR) testing. rRT-PCR-positive specimens underwent genotyping at Canada's National Microbiology Laboratory. Whole genome sequencing was performed on four outbreak and three sporadic viral culture isolates. Six hundred ninety-eight patients had IgM serology testing, of which 255 (37%) had culture and rRT-PCR. Among those, 35/698 (5%) were IgM positive, 39/255 (15%) culture positive and 47/255 (18%) rRT-PCR-positive. Buccal swabs had the highest rRT-PCR positivity (21%). The outbreak isolates were identical to that in the New York outbreak occurring at the same time. Nucleotide and amino acid identity with the Jeryl Lynn vaccine strain ranged from 85.0-94.5% and 82.4-99.4%, depending on the gene and coding sequences. Homology of the HN protein, the main immunogenic mumps virus protein, was found to be 94.5 and 95.3%, when compared to Jeryl Lynn vaccine major and minor components, respectively. Despite higher sensitivity than serology, rRT-PCR testing is underutilized. Further work is needed to better understand the suboptimal match of the HN gene between the outbreak strain and the Jeryl Lynn vaccine strain.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 21 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 4 19%
Researcher 3 14%
Student > Bachelor 2 10%
Professor 1 5%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 9 43%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Immunology and Microbiology 3 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 10%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 5%
Chemical Engineering 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 11 52%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 June 2018.
All research outputs
#16,498,373
of 20,520,938 outputs
Outputs from Virology Journal
#2,244
of 2,842 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#225,917
of 297,028 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Virology Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,520,938 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,842 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.8. This one is in the 7th percentile – i.e., 7% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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