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The effects of two common edible herbs, Ipomoea aquatica and Enhydra fluctuans, on cadmium-induced pathophysiology: a focus on oxidative defence and anti-apoptotic mechanism

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Translational Medicine, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Readers on

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44 Mendeley
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Title
The effects of two common edible herbs, Ipomoea aquatica and Enhydra fluctuans, on cadmium-induced pathophysiology: a focus on oxidative defence and anti-apoptotic mechanism
Published in
Journal of Translational Medicine, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12967-015-0598-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tarun K Dua, Saikat Dewanjee, Ritu Khanra, Niloy Bhattacharya, Bhuvan Bhaskar, Muhammad Zia-Ul-Haq, Vincenzo De Feo

Abstract

Ipomoea aquatica (Convolvulaceae) and Enhydra fluctuans (Asteraceae), two aquatic vegetables, are traditionally used against heavy metal toxicity in traditional medicines in India. The present study aimed to explore the protective role of edible (aqueous) extracts of I. aquatica (AEIA) and E. fluctuans (AEEF) against Cd-intoxication. The extracts were chemically standardized by spectroscopic and HPLC analysis. The cytoprotective roles of AEIA and AEEF were measured on mouse hepatocytes. The effect on redox status were measured after incubating the hepatocytes with CdCl2 (30 μM) along with AEIA or AEEF (400 μg/ml). The effects on the expressions of apoptotic signal proteins were estimated. The protective roles of AEIA or AEEF were measured by in vivo assay in mice. Haematological, serum biochemical, tissue redox status, Cd bioaccumulation and histological parameters were evaluated to estimate the protective role of AEIA or AEEF (100 mg/kg) against CdCl2 (4 mg/kg) intoxication. Phytochemical analysis revealed presence of substantial quantities of phenolics, flavonoids, saponins, carbohydrates and ascorbic acid in AEIA or AEEF. CdCl2 treated murine hepatocytes showed a gradual reduction of cell viability in a concentration dependent manner with an IC50 of ~30 μM. CdCl2 treated hepatocytes exhibited significantly enhanced levels (p < 0.01) of ROS production, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation and NADPH oxidase with concomitant depletion (p < 0.01) of antioxidant enzymes and GSH. However, AEIA or AEEF treatment along with CdCl2 significantly restored the aforementioned parameters in murine hepatocytes near to normalcy. Besides, AEIA or AEEF significantly counteracted (p < 0.05-0.01) with ROS mediated alteration of transcription levels of signal proteins viz. Bcl-2, BAD, Cyt-C, Caspases, Fas and Bid. In in vivo bioassay, CdCl2 treatment caused significantly high Cd bioaccumulation and oxidative stress in the liver, kidney, heart, brain and testes in mice. In addition, the haematological and serum biochemical parameters were significantly altered in the CdCl2 treated animals. Simultaneous administration of AEIA or AEEF could significantly restore the tested parameters to the near-normal status. The extracts would offer the overall protective effect via counteracting with Cd mediated oxidative stress and/or promoting the elimination of Cd by chelating.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 44 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 2%
Unknown 43 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 23%
Student > Bachelor 8 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 16%
Other 3 7%
Student > Master 3 7%
Other 6 14%
Unknown 7 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 20%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Other 5 11%
Unknown 10 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 October 2015.
All research outputs
#2,185,946
of 6,423,401 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Translational Medicine
#386
of 1,586 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#68,324
of 194,796 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Translational Medicine
#30
of 107 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,423,401 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 65th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,586 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 194,796 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 107 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.