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Pathways of care for HIV infected children in Beira, Mozambique: pre-post intervention study to assess impact of task shifting

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
70 Mendeley
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Title
Pathways of care for HIV infected children in Beira, Mozambique: pre-post intervention study to assess impact of task shifting
Published in
BMC Public Health, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5646-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Claudia Marotta, Carlo Giaquinto, Francesco Di Gennaro, Kajal D. Chhaganlal, Annalisa Saracino, Jorge Moiane, Guido Maringhini, Damiano Pizzol, Giovanni Putoto, Laura Monno, Alessandra Casuccio, Francesco Vitale, Walter Mazzucco

Abstract

In 2013, Mozambique implemented task-shifting (TS) from clinical officers to maternal and child nurses to improve care for HIV positive children < 5 years old. A retrospective, pre-post intervention study was designed to evaluate effectiveness of a new pathway of care in a sample of Beira District Local Health Facilities (LHFs), the primary, local, community healthcare services. The study was conducted by accessing registries of At Risk Children Clinics (ARCCs) and HIV Health Services. Two time periods, pre- and post-intervention, were compared using a set of endpoints. Variables distribution was explored using descriptive statistics. T-student, Mann Whitney and Chi-square tests were used for comparisons. Overall, 588 HIV infected children (F = 51.4%) were recruited, 330 belonging to the post intervention period. The mean time from referral to ARCC until initiation of ART decreased from 2.3 (± 4.4) to 1.1 (± 5.0) months after the intervention implementation (p-value: 0.000). A significant increase of Isoniazid prophylaxis (O.R.: 2.69; 95%CI: 1.7-4.15) and a decrease of both regular nutritional assessment (O.R. = 0.45; 95%CI: 0.31-0.64) and CD4 count at the beginning of ART (O.R. = 0.46; 95%CI: 0.32-0.65) were documented after the intervention. Despite several limitations and controversial results on nutrition assessment and CD4 count at the initiation of ART reported after the intervention, it could be assumed that TS alone may play a role in the improvement of the global effectiveness of care for HIV infected children only if integrated into a wider range of public health measures.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 70 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 70 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 20%
Researcher 11 16%
Student > Bachelor 7 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 10%
Other 6 9%
Other 12 17%
Unknown 13 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 14%
Social Sciences 6 9%
Psychology 5 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 4%
Other 13 19%
Unknown 16 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 June 2018.
All research outputs
#3,012,077
of 13,044,924 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#3,117
of 8,939 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#80,010
of 270,705 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,044,924 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,939 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,705 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them