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Refer-to-pharmacy: a qualitative study exploring the implementation of an electronic transfer of care initiative to improve medicines optimisation following hospital discharge

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
25 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

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78 Mendeley
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Title
Refer-to-pharmacy: a qualitative study exploring the implementation of an electronic transfer of care initiative to improve medicines optimisation following hospital discharge
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12913-018-3262-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jane Ferguson, Liz Seston, Darren M. Ashcroft

Abstract

Transition between care settings is a time of high risk for preventable medication errors. Poor communication about medication changes on discharge from hospital can result in adverse drug events and medicines-related readmissions. Refer-to-Pharmacy is a novel electronic referral system that allows hospital pharmacy staff to refer patients from their bedside to their community pharmacist for post-hospital discharge medication support. The aim of this study was to examine factors that promoted or inhibited the implementation of Refer-to-Pharmacy in hospital and community settings. Twenty six interviews with hospital pharmacists (n = 11), hospital technicians (n = 10), and community pharmacists (n = 5) using Normalisation Process Theory (NPT) as the underpinning conceptual framework for data collection and analysis. Using NPT to understand the implementation of the technology revealed that the participants unanimously agreed that the scheme was potentially beneficial for patients and was more efficient than previous systems (coherence). Leadership and initiation of the scheme was more achievable in the contained hospital environment, while initiation was slower to progress in the community pharmacy settings (cognitive participation). Hospital pharmacists and technicians worked flexibly together to deliver the scheme, and community pharmacists reported better communication with General Practitioners (GPs) about changes to patients' medication (collective action). However, participants reported being unaware of how the scheme impacted patients, meaning they were unable to evaluate the effectiveness of scheme (reflexive monitoring). The Refer-to-Pharmacy scheme was perceived by participants as having important benefits for patients, reduced the possibility for human error, and was more efficient than previous ways of working. However, initiation of the scheme was more achievable in the single site of the hospital in comparison to disparate community pharmacy organisations. Community and hospital pharmacists and organisational leaders will need to work individually and collectively if Refer-to-Pharmacy is to become more widely embedded across health settings.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 25 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 78 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 78 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 13%
Researcher 10 13%
Student > Bachelor 8 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 10%
Other 6 8%
Other 11 14%
Unknown 25 32%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 13 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 10%
Social Sciences 4 5%
Business, Management and Accounting 2 3%
Other 12 15%
Unknown 30 38%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 19. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 June 2018.
All research outputs
#842,860
of 13,462,296 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#313
of 4,500 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#30,968
of 269,932 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,462,296 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,500 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,932 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them