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The complex pattern of epigenomic variation between natural yeast strains at single-nucleosome resolution

Overview of attention for article published in Epigenetics & Chromatin, July 2015
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)

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8 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

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Title
The complex pattern of epigenomic variation between natural yeast strains at single-nucleosome resolution
Published in
Epigenetics & Chromatin, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13072-015-0019-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fabien Filleton, Florent Chuffart, Muniyandi Nagarajan, Hélène Bottin-Duplus, Gaël Yvert

Abstract

Epigenomic studies on humans and model species have revealed substantial inter-individual variation in histone modification profiles. However, the pattern of this variation has not been precisely characterized, particularly regarding which genomic features are enriched for variability and whether distinct histone marks co-vary synergistically. Yeast allows us to investigate intra-species variation at high resolution while avoiding other sources of variation, such as cell type or subtype. We profiled histone marks H3K4me3, H3K9ac, H3K14ac, H4K12ac and H3K4me1 in three unrelated wild strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae at single-nucleosome resolution and analyzed inter-strain differences statistically. All five marks varied significantly at specific loci, but to different extents. The number of nucleosomes varying for a given mark between two strains ranged from 20 to several thousands; +1 nucleosomes were significantly less subject to variation. Genes with highly evolvable or responsive expression showed higher variability; however, the variation pattern could not be explained by known transcriptional differences between the strains. Synergistic variation of distinct marks was not systematic, with surprising differences between functionally related H3K9ac and H3K14ac. Interestingly, H3K14ac differences that persisted through transient hyperacetylation were supported by H3K4me3 differences, suggesting stabilization via cross talk. Quantitative variation of histone marks among S. cerevisiae strains is abundant and complex. Its relation to functional characteristics is modular and seems modest, with partial association with gene expression divergences, differences between functionally related marks and partial co-variation between marks that may confer stability. Thus, the specific context of studies, such as which precise marks, individuals and genomic loci are investigated, is primordial in population epigenomics studies. The complexity found in this pilot survey in yeast suggests that high complexity can be anticipated among higher eukaryotes, including humans.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 29 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 38%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 31%
Student > Master 2 7%
Other 1 3%
Professor 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 4 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 41%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 28%
Neuroscience 1 3%
Chemistry 1 3%
Unknown 7 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 August 2015.
All research outputs
#4,951,052
of 17,604,218 outputs
Outputs from Epigenetics & Chromatin
#232
of 491 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#66,116
of 240,357 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Epigenetics & Chromatin
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,604,218 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 491 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 240,357 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them