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Factors associated with sexual risk taking behavior by precarious urban migrants in French Guiana

Overview of attention for article published in BMC International Health and Human Rights, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
3 Dimensions

Readers on

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42 Mendeley
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Title
Factors associated with sexual risk taking behavior by precarious urban migrants in French Guiana
Published in
BMC International Health and Human Rights, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12914-018-0164-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

August Eubanks, Marie Claire Parriault, Astrid Van Melle, Célia Basurko, Leila Adriouch, Claire Cropet, Mathieu Nacher

Abstract

French Guiana is highly affected by HIV. The migrant population is particularly susceptible. The objective of this study was to evaluate the level of risk of HIV transmission and its perception among migrants in French Guiana and to identify predictive factors. An HIV/AIDS Knowledge, Attitudes, Behaviors and Practices study was conducted in 2012 among migrants living in precarious neighborhoods of French Guiana. Of the 1039 participants surveyed, 893 were analyzed, of which 35.6% had risky sex during the past 12 months. Sexual risk taking was higher among the migrant population than in the general population. The predictors of sexual risk taking behavior were: younger age groups, males, having a job, not living with a spouse, having first had sex before age 16, using alcohol or drugs before sex, and having engaged in commercial sex recently. The factors associated with not being aware of one's risk were: being a woman, being from Guyana or Suriname, non-systematic use of condoms with a regular partner, and never or not recently having been tested for HIV. The results suggest there is still a need for information on HIV risks in a highly vulnerable population.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 42 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 19%
Researcher 7 17%
Student > Master 5 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 10%
Other 2 5%
Other 6 14%
Unknown 10 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 11 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 19%
Psychology 4 10%
Social Sciences 3 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 2%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 11 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 July 2018.
All research outputs
#2,451,716
of 15,922,938 outputs
Outputs from BMC International Health and Human Rights
#112
of 389 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#61,855
of 280,922 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC International Health and Human Rights
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,922,938 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 389 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 280,922 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them