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The CCR5Δ32 (rs333) polymorphism is not a predisposing factor for severe pandemic influenza in the Brazilian admixed population

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, July 2015
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Title
The CCR5Δ32 (rs333) polymorphism is not a predisposing factor for severe pandemic influenza in the Brazilian admixed population
Published in
BMC Research Notes, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13104-015-1299-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alvino Maestri, Mirleide Cordeiro dos Santos, Elzemar M Ribeiro-Rodrigues, Wyller Alencar de Mello, Rita Catarina Medeiros Sousa, Sidney Emanuel dos Santos, Vinicius Albuquerque Sortica

Abstract

Recent studies have tried to identify host genetic variants that could explain severe cases and deaths in infection with Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, especially among children and young adults. CCR5 is a chemokine receptor expressed on T cells, macrophages and dendritic cells, which is an important mediator of leukocyte chemotaxis during the immune response. A deletion mutation (Δ32) in this gene interferes with the response of immune cells, impairing viral clearance. We evaluated the CCR5Δ32 polymorphism (rs333) in individuals of the Brazilian admixed population with a diagnosis of Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 infection. A total of 330 subjects with a diagnosis of Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, evaluated at health services in the northern and northeastern regions of Brazil between June 2009 and August 2010, were genotyped for the Δ32 deletion (rs333). The cases were classified according to the progression of infection into a group of hospitalized patients (n = 156) and a group of non-hospitalized patients (n = 174). No significant differences in the allele or genotype frequencies of the CCR5Δ32 polymorphism were observed between non-hospitalized and hospitalized patients (p = 0.289 and p = 0.431, respectively). The Δ32 deletion in the CCR5 gene is not associated with an unfavorable outcome in patients infected with Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in the Brazilian admixed population.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 35%
Student > Bachelor 3 15%
Student > Master 2 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 5%
Librarian 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 5 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 30%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 10%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 5%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 5%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 7 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 August 2015.
All research outputs
#11,198,775
of 14,123,042 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#2,191
of 3,233 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#161,080
of 235,148 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#1
of 1 outputs
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