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Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial evaluating the efficacy of a telehealth program – management of asthma with supportive telehealth of respiratory function in pregnancy (MASTERY©)

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pulmonary Medicine, July 2015
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

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191 Mendeley
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Title
Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial evaluating the efficacy of a telehealth program – management of asthma with supportive telehealth of respiratory function in pregnancy (MASTERY©)
Published in
BMC Pulmonary Medicine, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12890-015-0082-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elida Zairina, Michael J. Abramson, Christine F. McDonald, Jonathan Li, Thanuja Dharmasiri, Kay Stewart, Susan P. Walker, Eldho Paul, Johnson George

Abstract

Telehealth has the potential to improve asthma management through regular monitoring of lung function and/or asthma symptoms by health professionals in conjunction with feedback to patients. Although the benefits of telehealth for improving asthma management have been extensively studied, the feasibility of telehealth for supporting asthma management in pregnant women has not been investigated. This study aims to evaluate the use of telehealth for remotely monitoring lung function and optimising asthma control during pregnancy. A randomised controlled trial comparing usual care with a telehealth program (MASTERY(©)) has been conducted. The intervention comprised a mobile application - Breathe-easy (©) supported by a Bluetooth-enabled handheld device (COPD-6®), which was used for self-monitoring of lung function (FEV1, FEV6) twice daily, and recording asthma symptoms and medication usage weekly; and a written asthma action plan (WAAP). The primary outcome measure is change in asthma control measured using the Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ). Secondary outcomes include changes in mini-Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (mAQLQ) score, lung function, asthma-related health visits, days off work/study, and oral corticosteroid use. Outcome data were collected at baseline, 3 months and 6 months by a research assistant masked to group allocation. Maternal and neonatal outcomes were also collected post-partum. This is the first study to evaluate the application of telehealth to optimize asthma management in pregnant women. If effective, this telehealth program could improve asthma self-management by pregnant women which may reduce the maternal and fetal risks of poorly controlled asthma during pregnancy. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ( ACTRN 12613000800729 ) 17 July 2013.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 191 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Unknown 189 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 14%
Student > Master 26 14%
Student > Bachelor 24 13%
Researcher 18 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 13 7%
Other 36 19%
Unknown 48 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 39 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 38 20%
Psychology 21 11%
Engineering 7 4%
Social Sciences 6 3%
Other 24 13%
Unknown 56 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 March 2016.
All research outputs
#3,807,004
of 7,408,484 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pulmonary Medicine
#316
of 587 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#119,299
of 226,115 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pulmonary Medicine
#17
of 29 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,408,484 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 587 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 226,115 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 29 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.