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Early medication use in new-onset rheumatoid arthritis may delay joint replacement: results of a large population-based study

Overview of attention for article published in Arthritis Research & Therapy, August 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

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46 Dimensions

Readers on

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86 Mendeley
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Title
Early medication use in new-onset rheumatoid arthritis may delay joint replacement: results of a large population-based study
Published in
Arthritis Research & Therapy, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13075-015-0713-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cristiano S. Moura, Michal Abrahamowicz, Marie-Eve Beauchamp, Diane Lacaille, Yishu Wang, Gilles Boire, Paul R. Fortin, Louis Bessette, Claire Bombardier, Jessica Widdifield, John G. Hanly, Debbie Feldman, Walter Maksymowych, Christine Peschken, Cheryl Barnabe, Steve Edworthy, Sasha Bernatsky

Abstract

Use of disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may prevent joint damage and potentially reduce joint replacement surgeries. We assessed the association between RA drug use and joint replacement in Quebec, Canada. A cohort of new-onset RA patients was identified from Quebec's physician billing and hospitalization databases from 2002-2011. The outcome was defined using procedure codes submitted by orthopedic surgeons. Medication use was obtained from pharmacy databases. We used alternative Cox regression models with time-dependent variables measuring the cumulative effects of past use during different time windows (one model focussing on the first year after cohort entry) for methotrexate (MTX), and other DMARDs. Models were adjusted for baseline sociodemographics, co-morbidity and prior health service use, time-dependent cumulative use of other drugs (anti-tumor necrosis factor [anti-TNF] agents, other biologics, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors [COXIBs], nonselective nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs [NSAIDs], and systemic steroids), and markers of disease severity. During follow-up, 608 joint replacements occurred among 11,333 patients (median follow-up: 4.6 years). The best-fitting model relied on the cumulative early use (within the first year after cohort entry) of MTX and of other DMARDs, with an interaction between MTX and other DMARDs. In this model, greater exposure within the first year, to either MTX (adjusted hazard ratio, HR = 0.95 per 1 month, 95 % confidence interval, 95 % CI 0.93-0.97) or other DMARDs (HR = 0.97, 95 % CI 0.95-0.99) was associated with longer time to joint replacement. Our results suggest that longer exposure to either methotrexate (MTX) or other DMARDs within the first year after RA diagnosis is associated with longer time to joint replacement surgery.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 86 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Colombia 1 1%
Unknown 84 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 16%
Researcher 10 12%
Student > Postgraduate 8 9%
Other 7 8%
Other 14 16%
Unknown 18 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 36 42%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 2%
Other 11 13%
Unknown 23 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 August 2015.
All research outputs
#6,576,745
of 12,667,610 outputs
Outputs from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#1,150
of 2,070 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#83,910
of 234,629 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,667,610 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,070 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 234,629 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them