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DNA methylation in stem cell renewal and multipotency

Overview of attention for article published in Stem Cell Research & Therapy, October 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 tweeter
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
q&a
1 Q&A thread

Citations

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74 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
174 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
DNA methylation in stem cell renewal and multipotency
Published in
Stem Cell Research & Therapy, October 2011
DOI 10.1186/scrt83
Pubmed ID
Authors

María Berdasco, Manel Esteller

Abstract

Owing to their potential for differentiation into multiple cell types, multipotent stem cells extracted from many adult tissues are an attractive stem cell resource for the replacement of damaged tissues in regenerative medicine. The requirements for cellular differentiation of an adult stem cell are a loss of proliferation potential and a gain of cell-type identity. These processes could be restricted by epigenetic modifications that prevent the risks of lineage-unrelated gene expression or the undifferentiated features of stem cells in adult somatic cells. In this review, we focus on the role of DNA methylation in controlling the transcriptional activity of genes important for self-renewal, the dynamism of CpG methylation of tissue-specific genes during several differentiation programs, and whether the multilineage potential of adult stem cells could be imposed early in the original precursor stem cells through CpG methylation. Additionally, we draw attention to the role of DNA methylation in adult stem cell differentiation by reviewing the reports on spontaneous differentiation after treatment with demethylating agents and by considering the evidence provided by reprogramming of somatic cells into undifferentiated cells (that is, somatic nuclear transfer or generation of induced pluripotent cells). It is clear from the evidence that DNA methylation is necessary for controlling stem cell proliferation and differentiation, but their exact contribution in each lineage program is still unclear. As a consequence, in a clinical setting, caution should be exerted before employing adult stem cells or their derivatives in regenerative medicine and appropriate tests should be applied to ensure the integrity of the genome and epigenome.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 174 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Turkey 1 <1%
India 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Unknown 170 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 35 20%
Student > Master 34 20%
Student > Bachelor 33 19%
Researcher 21 12%
Professor > Associate Professor 10 6%
Other 18 10%
Unknown 23 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 53 30%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 52 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 18 10%
Engineering 5 3%
Chemistry 3 2%
Other 11 6%
Unknown 32 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 October 2013.
All research outputs
#3,567,433
of 18,290,424 outputs
Outputs from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#352
of 1,889 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#23,182
of 123,649 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#1
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,290,424 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,889 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 123,649 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them