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Diversification and independent domestication of Asian and European pears

Overview of attention for article published in Genome Biology (Online Edition), June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)

Mentioned by

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14 tweeters

Citations

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95 Dimensions

Readers on

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109 Mendeley
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Title
Diversification and independent domestication of Asian and European pears
Published in
Genome Biology (Online Edition), June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13059-018-1452-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jun Wu, Yingtao Wang, Jiabao Xu, Schuyler S. Korban, Zhangjun Fei, Shutian Tao, Ray Ming, Shuaishuai Tai, Awais M. Khan, Joseph D. Postman, Chao Gu, Hao Yin, Danman Zheng, Kaijie Qi, Yong Li, Runze Wang, Cecilia H. Deng, Satish Kumar, David Chagné, Xiaolong Li, Juyou Wu, Xiaosan Huang, Huping Zhang, Zhihua Xie, Xiao Li, Mingyue Zhang, Yanhong Li, Zhen Yue, Xiaodong Fang, Jiaming Li, Leiting Li, Cong Jin, Mengfan Qin, Jiaying Zhang, Xiao Wu, Yaqi Ke, Jian Wang, Huanmimg Yang, Shaoling Zhang

Abstract

Pear (Pyrus) is a globally grown fruit, with thousands of cultivars in five domesticated species and dozens of wild species. However, little is known about the evolutionary history of these pear species and what has contributed to the distinct phenotypic traits between Asian pears and European pears. We report the genome resequencing of 113 pear accessions from worldwide collections, representing both cultivated and wild pear species. Based on 18,302,883 identified SNPs, we conduct phylogenetics, population structure, gene flow, and selective sweep analyses. Furthermore, we propose a model for the divergence, dissemination, and independent domestication of Asian and European pears in which pear, after originating in southwest China and then being disseminated throughout central Asia, has eventually spread to western Asia, and then on to Europe. We find evidence for rapid evolution and balancing selection for S-RNase genes that have contributed to the maintenance of self-incompatibility, thus promoting outcrossing and accounting for pear genome diversity across the Eurasian continent. In addition, separate selective sweep signatures between Asian pears and European pears, combined with co-localized QTLs and differentially expressed genes, underline distinct phenotypic fruit traits, including flesh texture, sugar, acidity, aroma, and stone cells. This study provides further clarification of the evolutionary history of pear along with independent domestication of Asian and European pears. Furthermore, it provides substantive and valuable genomic resources that will significantly advance pear improvement and molecular breeding efforts.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 109 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 109 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 20%
Researcher 17 16%
Student > Master 13 12%
Student > Bachelor 7 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 5%
Other 11 10%
Unknown 34 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 49 45%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 16 15%
Environmental Science 3 3%
Engineering 2 2%
Social Sciences 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 37 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 January 2022.
All research outputs
#3,678,973
of 22,577,901 outputs
Outputs from Genome Biology (Online Edition)
#2,399
of 4,087 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#68,214
of 301,360 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genome Biology (Online Edition)
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,577,901 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,087 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 27.6. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 301,360 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them