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Necrotizing enterocolitis is associated with acute brain responses in preterm pigs

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neuroinflammation, June 2018
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Title
Necrotizing enterocolitis is associated with acute brain responses in preterm pigs
Published in
Journal of Neuroinflammation, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12974-018-1201-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jing Sun, Xiaoyu Pan, Line I. Christiansen, Xiao-Long Yuan, Kerstin Skovgaard, Dereck E. W. Chatterton, Sanne S. Kaalund, Fei Gao, Per T. Sangild, Stanislava Pankratova

Abstract

Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is an acute gut inflammatory disorder that occurs in preterm infants in the first weeks after birth. Infants surviving NEC often show impaired neurodevelopment. The mechanisms linking NEC lesions with later neurodevelopment are poorly understood but may include proinflammatory signaling in the immature brain. Using preterm pigs as a model for preterm infants, we hypothesized that severe intestinal NEC lesions are associated with acute effects on the developing hippocampus. Cesarean-delivered preterm pigs (n = 117) were reared for 8 days and spontaneously developed variable severity of NEC lesions. Neonatal arousal, physical activity, and in vitro neuritogenic effects of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were investigated in pigs showing NEC lesions in the colon (Co-NEC) or in the small intestine (Si-NEC). Hippocampal transcriptome analysis and qPCR were used to assess gene expressions and their relation to biological processes, including neuroinflammation, and neural plasticity. Microglia activation was quantified by stereology. The neuritogenic response to selected proteins was investigated in primary cultures of hippocampal neurons. NEC development rapidly reduced the physical activity of pigs, especially when lesions occurred in the small intestine. Si-NEC and Co-NEC were associated with 27 and 12 hippocampal differentially expressed genes (DEGs), respectively. These included genes related to neuroinflammation (i.e., S100A8, S100A9, IL8, IL6, MMP8, SAA, TAGLN2) and hypoxia (i.e., PDK4, IER3, TXNIP, AGER), and they were all upregulated in Si-NEC pigs. Genes related to protection against oxidative stress (HBB, ALAS2) and oligodendrocytes (OPALIN) were downregulated in Si-NEC pigs. CSF collected from NEC pigs promoted neurite outgrowth in vitro, and the S100A9 and S100A8/S100A9 proteins may mediate the neuritogenic effects of NEC-related CSF on hippocampal neurons. NEC lesions did not affect total microglial cell number but markedly increased the proportion of Iba1-positive amoeboid microglial cells. NEC lesions, especially when present in the small intestine, are associated with changes to hippocampal gene expression that potentially mediate neuroinflammation and disturbed neural circuit formation via enhanced neuronal differentiation. Early brain-protective interventions may be critical for preterm infants affected by intestinal NEC lesions to reduce their later neurological dysfunctions.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 58 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 58 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 13 22%
Researcher 7 12%
Student > Postgraduate 6 10%
Other 3 5%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 5%
Other 7 12%
Unknown 19 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 11 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 9%
Neuroscience 5 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 9%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 5%
Other 8 14%
Unknown 21 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 June 2018.
All research outputs
#11,599,746
of 13,055,200 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neuroinflammation
#1,290
of 1,513 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#235,169
of 270,374 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neuroinflammation
#9
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,055,200 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,513 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,374 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.