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Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 1 block 2 gene polymorphism in field isolates along the slope of mount Cameroon: a cross – sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, August 2015
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Title
Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 1 block 2 gene polymorphism in field isolates along the slope of mount Cameroon: a cross – sectional study
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12879-015-1066-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tobias O. Apinjoh, Rolland B. Tata, Judith K. Anchang-Kimbi, Hanesh F. Chi, Eleanor M. Fon, Regina N. Mugri, Delphine A. Tangoh, Robert V. Nyingchu, Stephen M. Ghogomu, Theresa Nkuo-Akenji, Eric A. Achidi

Abstract

Malaria remains a major global health burden despite the intensification of control efforts, due partly to the lack of an effective vaccine. Information on genetic diversity in natural parasite populations constitutes a major impediment to vaccine development efforts and is limited in some endemic settings. The present study characterized diversity by investigating msp1 block 2 polymorphisms and the relationship between the allele families with ethnodemographic indices and clinical phenotype. Individuals with asymptomatic parasitaemia (AP) or uncomplicated malaria (UM) were enrolled from rural, semi-rural and semi-urban localities at varying altitudes along the slope of mount Cameroon. P. falciparum malaria parasitaemic blood screened by light microscopy was depleted of leucocytes using CF11 cellulose columns and the parasite DNA genotyped by nested PCR. Length polymorphism was assessed in 151 field isolates revealing 64 (5) and 274 (22) distinct recombinant and major msp1 allelic fragments (genotypes) respectively. All family specific allelic types (K1, MAD20 and RO33) as well as MR were observed in the different locations, with K1 being most abundant. Eighty seven (60 %) of individuals harbored more than one parasite clone, with a significant proportion (p = 0.009) in rural compared to other settings. AP individuals had higher (p = 0.007) K1 allele frequencies but lower (p = 0.003) mean multiplicity of genotypes per infection (2.00 ± 0.98 vs. 2.56 ± 1.17) compared to UM patients. These results indicate enormous diversity of P. falciparum in the area and suggests that allele specificity and complexity may be relevant for the progression to symptomatic disease.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 39 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 31%
Student > Bachelor 7 18%
Researcher 5 13%
Student > Master 3 8%
Lecturer 2 5%
Other 5 13%
Unknown 5 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 28%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 21%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 8%
Social Sciences 3 8%
Other 6 15%
Unknown 5 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 August 2015.
All research outputs
#3,609,603
of 5,450,695 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1,883
of 2,866 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#122,229
of 190,014 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#110
of 144 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,450,695 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,866 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 190,014 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 144 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.