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Indoor use of attractive toxic sugar bait (ATSB) to effectively control malaria vectors in Mali, West Africa

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, August 2015
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Title
Indoor use of attractive toxic sugar bait (ATSB) to effectively control malaria vectors in Mali, West Africa
Published in
Malaria Journal, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12936-015-0819-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Whitney A Qualls, Günter C Müller, Sekou F Traore, Mohamed M Traore, Kristopher L Arheart, Seydou Doumbia, Yosef Schlein, Vasiliy D Kravchenko, Rui-De Xue, John C Beier

Abstract

Attractive toxic sugar bait (ATSB) solutions containing any gut toxins can be either sprayed on plants or used in simple bait stations to attract and kill sugar-feeding female and male mosquitoes. This field study in Mali demonstrates the effect of ATSB bait stations inside houses as a vector control method that targets and kills endophilic African malaria vectors. The studies were conducted in five villages located near the River Niger, Mali. Baseline village-wide assessments of densities for female and male Anopheles gambiae sensu lato were performed by pyrethrum spray collections (PSC) in ten houses in each of five villages. To determine the rate of mosquito feeding on bait stations, one bait station per house containing attractive sugar bait (ASB) (without toxin) plus a food dye marker, was set up in ten houses in each of the five villages. PSC collections were conducted on the following day and the percentage of female and male mosquitoes that had fed was determined by visual inspection for the dye marker. Then, a 50-day field trial was done. In an experimental village, one bait station containing ATSB (1% boric acid active ingredient) was placed per bedroom (58 bedrooms), and indoor densities of female and male An. gambiae s.l. were subsequently determined by PSC, and female mosquitoes were age graded. In the five villages, the percentages of An. gambiae s.l. feeding inside houses on the non-toxic bait stations ranged from 28.3 to 53.1% for females and 36.9 to 78.3% for males. Following ATSB indoor bait station presentation, there was a significant reduction, 90% in female and 93% in male populations, of An. gambiae s.l. at the experimental village. A 3.8-fold decrease in the proportion of females that had undergone four or more gonotrophic cycles was recorded at the experimental village, compared to a 1.2-fold increase at the control village. The field trial demonstrates that An. gambiae s.l. feed readily from ATSB bait stations situated indoors, leading to a substantial reduction in the proportion of older female mosquitoes. This study demonstrates that ATSB inside houses can achieve impressive malaria vector control in Africa.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 141 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 140 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 20%
Researcher 25 18%
Student > Master 25 18%
Student > Bachelor 11 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 6%
Other 16 11%
Unknown 28 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 57 40%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 17 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 4%
Environmental Science 5 4%
Other 15 11%
Unknown 33 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 August 2015.
All research outputs
#3,836,685
of 5,450,695 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,714
of 2,173 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#131,395
of 190,069 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#94
of 105 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,450,695 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,173 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 190,069 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 105 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 2nd percentile – i.e., 2% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.