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Parents’ knowledge, attitudes and beliefs regarding sun protection in children: a qualitative study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, February 2018
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2 tweeters

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Title
Parents’ knowledge, attitudes and beliefs regarding sun protection in children: a qualitative study
Published in
BMC Public Health, February 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12889-018-5091-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zoe Littlewood, Sheila Greenfield

Abstract

Childhood is a critical period for sun protection, when the skin is particularly susceptible to the carcinogenic effects of ultraviolet radiation. Children are dependent upon parents to implement sun protective measures. Existing qualitative research exploring parents' attitudes and beliefs underpinning children's sun protection is from Australia, which has the highest melanoma incidence rates globally, and thus benefits from widespread sun protection awareness campaigns. Parents' sun protective behaviour may, therefore, differ between Australia and the UK. This study investigates the topic in a UK context, using qualitative methodology to gain detailed insights into a relatively under-researched area. The aim of the study was to explore parents' knowledge and understanding of sun protection in children, and factors that motivate and challenge them in this area. Finally, it aimed to determine if and how ethnicity and skin type influence these attitudes and beliefs. Twenty-two semi-structured individual interviews were carried out with parents of children aged 5 years or younger, recruited from local nurseries. Transcripts were analysed using thematic analysis. Four overarching themes emerged, each incorporating two to three sub-themes. 'Attitudes towards children's sun protection' refers to the fact that parents considered sun protection to be important for children, a finding which was consistent between different skin types. 'Sun protection practices' brings together several protective behaviours adopted in children and, to a lesser degree, in parents, and their associated disadvantages. 'Sun safety knowledge' refers to parents' awareness of the risks of sun exposure and the need for protection, and illustrates where gaps in knowledge exist, such as regarding the need for vitamin D, and the importance of vigilant sun protection even in the UK. Finally, 'motivating and facilitating factors' highlights motivations for sun protection in children, and factors that facilitate it in practice. This study found parents to be motivated and concerned about children's sun protection, irrespective of children's ethnicity, and aware of appropriate protective behaviours. It indicates key challenges which could be targeted in future campaigns in order to improve sun protection in children and reduce uncertainty and anxiety regarding sun safety amongst parents.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 104 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 104 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 16 15%
Student > Master 15 14%
Researcher 11 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 9%
Other 18 17%
Unknown 26 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 33 32%
Nursing and Health Professions 13 13%
Social Sciences 12 12%
Psychology 6 6%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 4%
Other 12 12%
Unknown 24 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 February 2020.
All research outputs
#12,844,220
of 16,810,341 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#9,547
of 11,471 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#196,860
of 283,742 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,810,341 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,471 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.3. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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