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Ten weeks of high-intensity interval walk training is associated with reduced disease activity and improved innate immune function in older adults with rheumatoid arthritis: a pilot study

Overview of attention for article published in Arthritis Research & Therapy, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#24 of 2,885)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
10 news outlets
twitter
20 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
video
1 video uploader

Citations

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68 Dimensions

Readers on

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275 Mendeley
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Title
Ten weeks of high-intensity interval walk training is associated with reduced disease activity and improved innate immune function in older adults with rheumatoid arthritis: a pilot study
Published in
Arthritis Research & Therapy, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13075-018-1624-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

David B. Bartlett, Leslie H. Willis, Cris A. Slentz, Andrew Hoselton, Leslie Kelly, Janet L. Huebner, Virginia B. Kraus, Jennifer Moss, Michael J. Muehlbauer, Guillaume Spielmann, William E. Kraus, Janet M. Lord, Kim M. Huffman

Abstract

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease in which adults have significant joint issues leading to poor health. Poor health is compounded by many factors, including exercise avoidance and increased risk of opportunistic infection. Exercise training can improve the health of patients with RA and potentially improve immune function; however, information on the effects of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) in RA is limited. We sought to determine whether 10 weeks of a walking-based HIIT program would be associated with health improvements as measured by disease activity and aerobic fitness. Further, we assessed whether HIIT was associated with improved immune function, specifically antimicrobial/bacterial functions of neutrophils and monocytes. Twelve physically inactive adults aged 64 ± 7 years with either seropositive or radiographically proven (bone erosions) RA completed 10 weeks of high-intensity interval walking. Training consisted of 3 × 30-minute sessions/week of ten ≥ 60-second intervals of high intensity (80-90% VO2reserve) separated by similar bouts of lower-intensity intervals (50-60% VO2reserve). Pre- and postintervention assessments included aerobic and physical function; disease activity as measured by Disease Activity score in 28 joints (DAS28), self-perceived health, C-reactive protein (CRP), and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR); plasma interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL)-8, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α concentrations; and neutrophil and monocyte phenotypes and functions. Despite minimal body composition change, cardiorespiratory fitness increased by 9% (change in both relative and absolute aerobic capacity; p < 0.001), and resting blood pressure and heart rate were both reduced (both p < 0.05). Postintervention disease activity was reduced by 38% (DAS28; p = 0.001) with significant reductions in ESR and swollen joints as well as improved self-perceived health. Neutrophil migration toward CXCL-8 (p = 0.003), phagocytosis of Escherichia coli (p = 0.03), and ROS production (p < 0.001) all increased following training. The frequency of cluster of differentiation 14-positive (CD14+)/CD16+ monocytes was reduced (p = 0.002), with both nonclassical (CD14dim/CD16bright) and intermediate (CD14bright/CD16positive) monocytes being reduced (both p < 0.05). Following training, the cell surface expression of intermediate monocyte Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), TLR4, and HLA-DR was reduced (all p < 0.05), and monocyte phagocytosis of E. coli increased (p = 0.02). No changes were observed for inflammatory markers IL-1β, IL-6, CXCL-8, IL-10, CRP, or TNF-α. We report for the first time, to our knowledge, that a high-intensity interval walking protocol in older adults with stable RA is associated with reduced disease activity, improved cardiovascular fitness, and improved innate immune functions, indicative of reduced infection risk and inflammatory potential. Importantly, the exercise program was well tolerated by these patients. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02528344 . Registered on 19 August 2015.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 275 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 275 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 37 13%
Student > Master 32 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 8%
Researcher 16 6%
Student > Postgraduate 13 5%
Other 52 19%
Unknown 102 37%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 43 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 36 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 32 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 4%
Immunology and Microbiology 7 3%
Other 31 11%
Unknown 115 42%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 91. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 March 2022.
All research outputs
#362,249
of 21,778,818 outputs
Outputs from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#24
of 2,885 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9,113
of 299,481 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,778,818 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,885 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 299,481 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them