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Natural variation in genes potentially involved in plant architecture and adaptation in switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.)

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, June 2018
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (66th percentile)

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8 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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26 Mendeley
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Title
Natural variation in genes potentially involved in plant architecture and adaptation in switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.)
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12862-018-1193-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bochra A. Bahri, Guillaume Daverdin, Xiangyang Xu, Jan-Fang Cheng, Kerrie W. Barry, E. Charles Brummer, Katrien M. Devos

Abstract

Advances in genomic technologies have expanded our ability to accurately and exhaustively detect natural genomic variants that can be applied in crop improvement and to increase our knowledge of plant evolution and adaptation. Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), an allotetraploid (2n = 4× = 36) perennial C4 grass (Poaceae family) native to North America and a feedstock crop for cellulosic biofuel production, has a large potential for genetic improvement due to its high genotypic and phenotypic variation. In this study, we analyzed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variation in 372 switchgrass genotypes belonging to 36 accessions for 12 genes putatively involved in biomass production to investigate signatures of selection that could have led to ecotype differentiation and to population adaptation to geographic zones. A total of 11,682 SNPs were mined from ~ 15 Gb of sequence data, out of which 251 SNPs were retained after filtering. Population structure analysis largely grouped upland accessions into one subpopulation and lowland accessions into two additional subpopulations. The most frequent SNPs were in homozygous state within accessions. Sixty percent of the exonic SNPs were non-synonymous and, of these, 45% led to non-conservative amino acid changes. The non-conservative SNPs were largely in linkage disequilibrium with one haplotype being predominantly present in upland accessions while the other haplotype was commonly present in lowland accessions. Tajima's test of neutrality indicated that PHYB, a gene involved in photoperiod response, was under positive selection in the switchgrass population. PHYB carried a SNP leading to a non-conservative amino acid change in the PAS domain, a region that acts as a sensor for light and oxygen in signal transduction. Several non-conservative SNPs in genes potentially involved in plant architecture and adaptation have been identified and led to population structure and genetic differentiation of ecotypes in switchgrass. We suggest here that PHYB is a key gene involved in switchgrass natural selection. Further analyses are needed to determine whether any of the non-conservative SNPs identified play a role in the differential adaptation of upland and lowland switchgrass.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 26 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 19%
Student > Bachelor 5 19%
Researcher 4 15%
Student > Master 4 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 4%
Other 5 19%
Unknown 2 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 46%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 19%
Environmental Science 2 8%
Chemical Engineering 1 4%
Unspecified 1 4%
Other 1 4%
Unknown 4 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 October 2018.
All research outputs
#5,256,802
of 19,282,793 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1,227
of 2,844 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#97,003
of 292,703 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,282,793 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,844 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 292,703 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them