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Two divergent Symbiodinium genomes reveal conservation of a gene cluster for sunscreen biosynthesis and recently lost genes

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, June 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

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18 tweeters
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3 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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94 Dimensions

Readers on

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87 Mendeley
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Title
Two divergent Symbiodinium genomes reveal conservation of a gene cluster for sunscreen biosynthesis and recently lost genes
Published in
BMC Genomics, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12864-018-4857-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eiichi Shoguchi, Girish Beedessee, Ipputa Tada, Kanako Hisata, Takeshi Kawashima, Takeshi Takeuchi, Nana Arakaki, Manabu Fujie, Ryo Koyanagi, Michael C. Roy, Masanobu Kawachi, Michio Hidaka, Noriyuki Satoh, Chuya Shinzato

Abstract

The marine dinoflagellate, Symbiodinium, is a well-known photosynthetic partner for coral and other diverse, non-photosynthetic hosts in subtropical and tropical shallows, where it comprises an essential component of marine ecosystems. Using molecular phylogenetics, the genus Symbiodinium has been classified into nine major clades, A-I, and one of the reported differences among phenotypes is their capacity to synthesize mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs), which absorb UV radiation. However, the genetic basis for this difference in synthetic capacity is unknown. To understand genetics underlying Symbiodinium diversity, we report two draft genomes, one from clade A, presumed to have been the earliest branching clade, and the other from clade C, in the terminal branch. The nuclear genome of Symbiodinium clade A (SymA) has more gene families than that of clade C, with larger numbers of organelle-related genes, including mitochondrial transcription terminal factor (mTERF) and Rubisco. While clade C (SymC) has fewer gene families, it displays specific expansions of repeat domain-containing genes, such as leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) and retrovirus-related dUTPases. Interestingly, the SymA genome encodes a gene cluster for MAA biosynthesis, potentially transferred from an endosymbiotic red alga (probably of bacterial origin), while SymC has completely lost these genes. Our analysis demonstrates that SymC appears to have evolved by losing gene families, such as the MAA biosynthesis gene cluster. In contrast to the conservation of genes related to photosynthetic ability, the terminal clade has suffered more gene family losses than other clades, suggesting a possible adaptation to symbiosis. Overall, this study implies that Symbiodinium ecology drives acquisition and loss of gene families.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 18 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 87 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 87 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 23%
Student > Master 15 17%
Student > Bachelor 12 14%
Researcher 11 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 7%
Other 6 7%
Unknown 17 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 27 31%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 20 23%
Environmental Science 7 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 2%
Engineering 2 2%
Other 7 8%
Unknown 22 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 November 2021.
All research outputs
#2,248,571
of 21,744,520 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#727
of 10,390 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#48,420
of 299,595 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#2
of 20 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,744,520 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 10,390 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 299,595 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 20 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.