↓ Skip to main content

Understanding the motivations for keeping wild birds in the semi-arid region of Brazil

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, June 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
68 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Understanding the motivations for keeping wild birds in the semi-arid region of Brazil
Published in
Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13002-018-0243-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wallisson Sylas Luna de Oliveira, Sérgio de Faria Lopes, Rômulo Romeu Nóbrega Alves

Abstract

Birds are kept as pets around the world, and bird-keeping is an ancient and widespread practice, constituting one of the main reasons for the decline of some species. In the semi-arid region of Brazil, this practice is very common and continues despite being designated as illegal in recent decades. This study aimed to identify the species and families of songbirds used as pets in the semi-arid region of Brazil, characterize the maintenance of the exploited species in captivity, and evaluate the sociocultural context associated with this practice. Data were collected from a total of 62 wild bird-keepers in the study area through interviews using semi-structured forms and informal conversations. A total of 34 bird species are bred as pets in the study area. Thraupidae was the most represented family in this study followed by Icteridae, and together, these families accounted for 61.7% of the local specimens. As reported by the respondents, birds are acquired by capturing them in rural areas or through local and regional markets. The number of species identified by the respondents did not differ according to respondent income, educational level, or age (p > 0.05). Maintaining these birds in cages includes some care, such as providing feed, medicine, and in some cases, training to improve their song or to learn songs from other species. The species with the highest use values (UVs) were Sporophila albogularis (UV = 0.83), Paroaria dominicana (0.82), and Sporophila nigricollis (0.79), indicating their importance as wild animal pets. The birds reported in this study have strong cultural importance and high economic value for the people involved in bird-keeping. In this sense, ethnoornithological studies are fundamentally important since they can provide basic information to inform plans and actions to promote the conservation and sustainable management of local avifauna, including the essential element of environmental education strategies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 68 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 68 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 25%
Student > Bachelor 10 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 7%
Researcher 4 6%
Other 12 18%
Unknown 13 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 15 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 21%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 6%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 4%
Other 12 18%
Unknown 16 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 February 2021.
All research outputs
#6,306,579
of 20,815,952 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#261
of 699 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#90,974
of 248,927 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,815,952 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 68th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 699 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 248,927 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them