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Patterns of genetic variation in the endangered European mink (Mustela lutreola L., 1761)

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, July 2015
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Title
Patterns of genetic variation in the endangered European mink (Mustela lutreola L., 1761)
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12862-015-0427-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maria Teresa Cabria, Elena G. Gonzalez, Benjamin J. Gomez-Moliner, Johan R. Michaux, Dimitry Skumatov, Andreas Kranz, Pascal Fournier, Santiago Palazon, Rafael Zardoya

Abstract

The European mink (Mustela lutreola, L. 1761) is a critically endangered mustelid, which inhabits several main river drainages in Europe. Here, we assess the genetic variation of existing populations of this species, including new sampling sites and additional molecular markers (newly developed microsatellite loci specific to European mink) as compared to previous studies. Probabilistic analyses were used to examine genetic structure within and between existing populations, and to infer phylogeographic processes and past demography. According to both mitochondrial and nuclear microsatellite markers, Northeastern (Russia, Estonia and Belarus) and Southeastern (Romania) European populations showed the highest intraspecific diversity. In contrast, Western European (France and Spain) populations were the least polymorphic, featuring a unique mitochondrial DNA haplotype. The high differentiation values detected between Eastern and Western European populations could be the result of genetic drift in the latter due to population isolation and reduction. Genetic differences among populations were further supported by Bayesian clustering and two main groups were confirmed (Eastern vs. Western Europe) along with two contained subgroups at a more local scale (Northeastern vs. Southeastern Europe; France vs. Spain). Genetic data and performed analyses support a historical scenario of stable European mink populations, not affected by Quaternary climate oscillations in the Late Pleistocene, and posterior expansion events following river connections in both North- and Southeastern European populations. This suggests an eastern refuge during glacial maxima (as already proposed for boreal and continental species). In contrast, Western Europe was colonised more recently following either natural expansions or putative human introductions. Low levels of genetic diversity observed within each studied population suggest recent bottleneck events and stress the urgent need for conservation measures to counteract the demographic decline experienced by the European mink.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 42 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 21%
Researcher 8 19%
Student > Bachelor 6 14%
Student > Master 5 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 2%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 9 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 12 29%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 14%
Environmental Science 5 12%
Social Sciences 3 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 5%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 11 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 September 2015.
All research outputs
#7,762,649
of 12,373,386 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1,785
of 2,341 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#126,628
of 237,027 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#4
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,373,386 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,341 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.2. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 237,027 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.