↓ Skip to main content

Characteristics of neonates with culture-proven bloodstream infection who have low levels of C-reactive protein (≦10 mg/L)

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, August 2015
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
28 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
116 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Characteristics of neonates with culture-proven bloodstream infection who have low levels of C-reactive protein (≦10 mg/L)
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12879-015-1069-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mei-Yin Lai, Ming-Horng Tsai, Chiang-Wen Lee, Ming-Chou Chiang, Reyin Lien, Ren-Huei Fu, Hsuan-Rong Huang, Shih-Ming Chu, Jen-Fu Hsu

Abstract

Elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) level is widely used in clinical practice as a marker to distinguish between neonates with or without sepsis. However, some neonates with bacteremia have a CRP level within the normal range and they are not well characterized. All episodes of neonatal culture-proven bloodstream infections (BSIs) between July 2004 and June 2012 were enrolled. Patients characteristics were compared for three CRP groups (low, ≤ 10 mg/L; intermediate, 11-100 mg/L; and high, > 100 mg/L) using the Chi-square test and one-way ANOVA. The sepsis-attributable mortality rates were compared using logistic regression analyses. Of 986 episodes of neonatal BSI, 247 (25.1 %) had CRP ≤10 mg/L at the onset of clinical sepsis. In the low CRP group, patients had lower gestational age and birth weight, and an earlier occurrence of BSI. Patients with underlying gastrointestinal pathology, renal disorders, cholestasis, and pulmonary hypertension had a non-significant elevated CRP level at the onset of sepsis. In the blood culture of the low CRP group, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) were relatively more common (55.9 %, p < 0.001) than the other two groups, although one-fourth were infected with gram-negative bacilli (19.0 %), fungi (2.8 %), or polymicrobial pathogens (3.6 %). Of the BSIs with initial low CRP, 29.1 % were treated with inadequate antibiotics, 13.0 % progressed to septic shock, and 5.3 % had infectious complications. The sepsis-attributable mortality rate was lower in the low CRP group (4.9 %) than in the high CRP group (13.6 %). A considerable proportion of neonatal BSIs had a normal or low initial CRP level (≤10 mg/L), which was more likely to occur in low birth weight or extremely preterm infants, those with earlier onset of sepsis, and those infected with CoNS. Plasma CRP level should not be used to rule out severe culture-proven sepsis or guide the empirical choice of antibiotics.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 116 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 116 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 19 16%
Student > Bachelor 14 12%
Other 12 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 9%
Other 28 24%
Unknown 21 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 57 49%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 3%
Other 14 12%
Unknown 24 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 August 2015.
All research outputs
#4,556,191
of 5,476,876 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#2,697
of 2,886 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#153,484
of 191,544 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#141
of 144 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,476,876 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,886 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 191,544 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 144 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.