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The role of the open abdomen procedure in managing severe abdominal sepsis: WSES position paper

Overview of attention for article published in World Journal of Emergency Surgery, August 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
124 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
187 Mendeley
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Title
The role of the open abdomen procedure in managing severe abdominal sepsis: WSES position paper
Published in
World Journal of Emergency Surgery, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13017-015-0032-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Massimo Sartelli, Fikri M. Abu-Zidan, Luca Ansaloni, Miklosh Bala, Marcelo A. Beltrán, Walter L. Biffl, Fausto Catena, Osvaldo Chiara, Federico Coccolini, Raul Coimbra, Zaza Demetrashvili, Demetrios Demetriades, Jose J. Diaz, Salomone Di Saverio, Gustavo P. Fraga, Wagih Ghnnam, Ewen A. Griffiths, Sanjay Gupta, Andreas Hecker, Aleksandar Karamarkovic, Victor Y. Kong, Reinhold Kafka-Ritsch, Yoram Kluger, Rifat Latifi, Ari Leppaniemi, Jae Gil Lee, Michael McFarlane, Sanjay Marwah, Frederick A. Moore, Carlos A. Ordonez, Gerson Alves Pereira, Haralds Plaudis, Vishal G. Shelat, Jan Ulrych, Sanoop K. Zachariah, Martin D. Zielinski, Maria Paula Garcia, Ernest E. Moore

Abstract

The open abdomen (OA) procedure is a significant surgical advance, as part of damage control techniques in severe abdominal trauma. Its application can be adapted to the advantage of patients with severe abdominal sepsis, however its precise role in these patients is still not clear. In severe abdominal sepsis the OA may allow early identification and draining of any residual infection, control any persistent source of infection, and remove more effectively infected or cytokine-loaded peritoneal fluid, preventing abdominal compartment syndrome and deferring definitive intervention and anastomosis until the patient is appropriately resuscitated and hemodynamically stable and thus better able to heal. However, the OA may require multiple returns to the operating room and may be associated with significant complications, including enteroatmospheric fistulas, loss of abdominal wall domain and large hernias. Surgeons should be aware of the pathophysiology of severe intra-abdominal sepsis and always keep in mind the option of using open abdomen to be able to use it in the right patient at the right time.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 187 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Russia 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 181 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 30 16%
Other 27 14%
Researcher 25 13%
Student > Master 14 7%
Student > Bachelor 14 7%
Other 41 22%
Unknown 36 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 122 65%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 2%
Unspecified 2 1%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 1%
Other 8 4%
Unknown 46 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 August 2015.
All research outputs
#3,899,055
of 8,600,861 outputs
Outputs from World Journal of Emergency Surgery
#88
of 258 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#92,592
of 230,700 outputs
Outputs of similar age from World Journal of Emergency Surgery
#6
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,600,861 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 53rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 258 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 230,700 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.