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Is there an association between vitamin D deficiency and adenotonsillar hypertrophy in children with sleep-disordered breathing?

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pediatrics, June 2018
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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9 Dimensions

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47 Mendeley
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Title
Is there an association between vitamin D deficiency and adenotonsillar hypertrophy in children with sleep-disordered breathing?
Published in
BMC Pediatrics, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12887-018-1178-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ji-Hyeon Shin, Byung-Guk Kim, Boo Young Kim, Soo Whan Kim, Sung Won Kim, Hojong Kim

Abstract

Low vitamin D levels have been linked to the risk of sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) in children. Although adenotonsillar hypertrophy (ATH) is the major contributor to childhood SDB, the relationship between ATH and serum vitamin D is uncertain. We therefore investigated the relationship between vitamin D levels and associated factors in children with ATH. We reviewed data from all children with SDB symptoms who were treated from December 2013 to February 2014. Of these, 88 children whose serum vitamin D levels were measured were enrolled in the study. We divided the children into four groups based on adenoidal and/or tonsillar hypertrophy. We conducted a retrospective chart review to analyze demographic data, the sizes of tonsils and adenoids, serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D [25(OH)D] level, body mass index (BMI), and allergen sensitization patterns. Children in the ATH group had a lower mean 25(OH)D level than did those in the control group (p < 0.05). Children with vitamin D deficiencies exhibited markedly higher frequencies of adenoidal and/or tonsillar hypertrophy than did those with sufficient vitamin D (p < 0.05). Spearman's correlation analysis identified an inverse correlation between serum 25(OH)D levels and age, tonsil and adenoid size, and height (all p < 0.05). In a multiple regression analysis, tonsil and adenoid size as well as BMI-z score, were associated with 25(OH)D levels after controlling for age, sex, height, and mite sensitization (p < 0.05). Our results suggest that low vitamin D levels are linked to ATH. Both the sizes of the adenoids and tonsils and the BMI-z score were associated with the 25(OH)D level. Therefore, measurement of the serum 25(OH)D level should be considered in children with ATH and SDB symptoms.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 47 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 13%
Student > Bachelor 6 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Lecturer 3 6%
Other 12 26%
Unknown 12 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 22 47%
Neuroscience 3 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 2%
Unspecified 1 2%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 14 30%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 February 2022.
All research outputs
#5,315,868
of 21,712,946 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pediatrics
#831
of 2,810 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#88,144
of 296,399 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pediatrics
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,712,946 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,810 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 296,399 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them