↓ Skip to main content

Use of mobile technology-based participatory mapping approaches to geolocate health facility attendees for disease surveillance in low resource settings

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Health Geographics, June 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
26 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
130 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Use of mobile technology-based participatory mapping approaches to geolocate health facility attendees for disease surveillance in low resource settings
Published in
International Journal of Health Geographics, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12942-018-0141-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kimberly M. Fornace, Henry Surendra, Tommy Rowel Abidin, Ralph Reyes, Maria L. M. Macalinao, Gillian Stresman, Jennifer Luchavez, Riris A. Ahmad, Supargiyono, Fe Espino, Chris J. Drakeley, Jackie Cook

Abstract

Identifying fine-scale spatial patterns of disease is essential for effective disease control and elimination programmes. In low resource areas without formal addresses, novel strategies are needed to locate residences of individuals attending health facilities in order to efficiently map disease patterns. We aimed to assess the use of Android tablet-based applications containing high resolution maps to geolocate individual residences, whilst comparing the functionality, usability and cost of three software packages designed to collect spatial information. Using Open Data Kit GeoODK, we designed and piloted an electronic questionnaire for rolling cross sectional surveys of health facility attendees as part of a malaria elimination campaign in two predominantly rural sites in the Rizal, Palawan, the Philippines and Kulon Progo Regency, Yogyakarta, Indonesia. The majority of health workers were able to use the tablets effectively, including locating participant households on electronic maps. For all households sampled (n = 603), health facility workers were able to retrospectively find the participant household using the Global Positioning System (GPS) coordinates and data collected by tablet computers. Median distance between actual house locations and points collected on the tablet was 116 m (IQR 42-368) in Rizal and 493 m (IQR 258-886) in Kulon Progo Regency. Accuracy varied between health facilities and decreased in less populated areas with fewer prominent landmarks. Results demonstrate the utility of this approach to develop real-time high-resolution maps of disease in resource-poor environments. This method provides an attractive approach for quickly obtaining spatial information on individuals presenting at health facilities in resource poor areas where formal addresses are unavailable and internet connectivity is limited. Further research is needed on how to integrate these with other health data management systems and implement in a wider operational context.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 130 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 130 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 26 20%
Researcher 20 15%
Student > Bachelor 12 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 8%
Other 10 8%
Other 24 18%
Unknown 27 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 16 12%
Social Sciences 13 10%
Engineering 12 9%
Environmental Science 8 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 6%
Other 37 28%
Unknown 36 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 June 2018.
All research outputs
#7,399,458
of 13,133,585 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Health Geographics
#271
of 487 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#131,303
of 268,141 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Health Geographics
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,133,585 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 487 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,141 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them