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T1 mapping and T2 mapping at 3T for quantifying the area-at-risk in reperfused STEMI patients

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (Taylor & Francis Ltd), August 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)

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93 Mendeley
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Title
T1 mapping and T2 mapping at 3T for quantifying the area-at-risk in reperfused STEMI patients
Published in
Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (Taylor & Francis Ltd), August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12968-015-0173-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Heerajnarain Bulluck, Steven K. White, Stefania Rosmini, Anish Bhuva, Thomas A. Treibel, Marianna Fontana, Amna Abdel-Gadir, Anna Herrey, Charlotte Manisty, Simon M. Y. Wan, Ashley Groves, Leon Menezes, James C. Moon, Derek J. Hausenloy

Abstract

Whether T1-mapping cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) can accurately quantify the area-at-risk (AAR) as delineated by T2 mapping and assess myocardial salvage at 3T in reperfused ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients is not known and was investigated in this study. 18 STEMI patients underwent CMR at 3T (Siemens Bio-graph mMR) at a median of 5 (4-6) days post primary percutaneous coronary intervention using native T1 (MOLLI) and T2 mapping (WIP #699; Siemens Healthcare, UK). Matching short-axis T1 and T2 maps covering the entire left ventricle (LV) were assessed by two independent observers using manual, Otsu and 2 standard deviation thresholds. Inter- and intra-observer variability, correlation and agreement between the T1 and T2 mapping techniques on a per-slice and per patient basis were assessed. A total of 125 matching T1 and T2 mapping short-axis slices were available for analysis from 18 patients. The acquisition times were identical for the T1 maps and T2 maps. 18 slices were excluded due to suboptimal image quality. Both mapping sequences were equally prone to susceptibility artifacts in the lateral wall and were equally likely to be affected by microvascular obstruction requiring manual correction. The Otsu thresholding technique performed best in terms of inter- and intra-observer variability for both T1 and T2 mapping CMR. The mean myocardial infarct size was 18.8 ± 9.4 % of the LV. There was no difference in either the mean AAR (32.3 ± 11.5 % of the LV versus 31.6 ± 11.2 % of the LV, P = 0.25) or myocardial salvage index (0.40 ± 0.26 versus 0.39 ± 0.27, P = 0.20) between the T1 and T2 mapping techniques. On a per-slice analysis, there was an excellent correlation between T1 mapping and T2 mapping in the quantification of the AAR with an R(2) of 0.95 (P < 0.001), with no bias (mean ± 2SD: bias 0.0 ± 9.6 %). On a per-patient analysis, the correlation and agreement remained excellent with no bias (R(2) 0.95, P < 0.0001, bias 0.7 ± 5.1 %). T1 mapping CMR at 3T performed as well as T2 mapping in quantifying the AAR and assessing myocardial salvage in reperfused STEMI patients, thereby providing an alternative CMR measure of the the AAR.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 23 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 93 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 91 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 18 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 13%
Student > Master 8 9%
Student > Postgraduate 7 8%
Other 16 17%
Unknown 15 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 56 60%
Engineering 5 5%
Computer Science 2 2%
Psychology 2 2%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 2%
Other 5 5%
Unknown 21 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 May 2017.
All research outputs
#1,589,032
of 19,342,442 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (Taylor & Francis Ltd)
#70
of 1,172 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#24,363
of 245,142 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance (Taylor & Francis Ltd)
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,342,442 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,172 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 245,142 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them