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Interventions to reduce adverse health outcomes resulting from manifestations of gender bias amongst immigrant populations: a scoping review

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Women's Health, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
68 Mendeley
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Title
Interventions to reduce adverse health outcomes resulting from manifestations of gender bias amongst immigrant populations: a scoping review
Published in
BMC Women's Health, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12905-018-0604-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alia Januwalla, Ariel Pulver, Susitha Wanigaratne, Patricia O’Campo, Marcelo L. Urquia

Abstract

Immigrants to Western countries increasingly originate from countries with pervasive gender inequalities, where women experience disproportionately high rates of threats to their well-being. Health and social services in countries of settlement encounter several adverse outcomes linked to gender bias among immigrant groups. Little is known about interventions implemented to address manifestations of gender bias among immigrant populations. A scoping review was undertaken to describe the literature on existing interventions and determine knowledge gaps. Nine academic and grey literature databases were searched for literature, with four reviewers screening the results. Of the 29 included reports, most targeted domestic violence amongst the Latino population in the United States, with few interventions focusing on other outcomes, populations, and settings. The majority reported achieving their objective, although 13 interventions were not evaluated. Future research and practice to address gender bias among immigrants may benefit from expanding on ethnic diversity, designing and reporting evaluations, addressing the context of gender inequities, tailoring to local community needs, and engaging community-based groups.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 68 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 68 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 9 13%
Student > Master 9 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 10%
Other 5 7%
Other 11 16%
Unknown 20 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 12 18%
Psychology 9 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 10%
Arts and Humanities 2 3%
Other 8 12%
Unknown 23 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 February 2019.
All research outputs
#2,062,241
of 14,280,939 outputs
Outputs from BMC Women's Health
#173
of 854 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#57,993
of 273,917 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Women's Health
#1
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,280,939 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 85th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 854 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,917 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them