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A call for action to establish a research agenda for building a future health workforce in Europe

Overview of attention for article published in Health Research Policy and Systems, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
49 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
35 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
123 Mendeley
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Title
A call for action to establish a research agenda for building a future health workforce in Europe
Published in
Health Research Policy and Systems, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12961-018-0333-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ellen Kuhlmann, Ronald Batenburg, Matthias Wismar, Gilles Dussault, Claudia B. Maier, Irene A. Glinos, Natasha Azzopardi-Muscat, Christine Bond, Viola Burau, Tiago Correia, Peter P. Groenewegen, Johan Hansen, David J. Hunter, Usman Khan, Hans H. Kluge, Marieke Kroezen, Claudia Leone, Milena Santric-Milicevic, Walter Sermeus, Marius Ungureanu

Abstract

The importance of a sustainable health workforce is increasingly recognised. However, the building of a future health workforce that is responsive to diverse population needs and demographic and economic change remains insufficiently understood. There is a compelling argument to be made for a comprehensive research agenda to address the questions. With a focus on Europe and taking a health systems approach, we introduce an agenda linked to the 'Health Workforce Research' section of the European Public Health Association. Six major objectives for health workforce policy were identified: (1) to develop frameworks that align health systems/governance and health workforce policy/planning, (2) to explore the effects of changing skill mixes and competencies across sectors and occupational groups, (3) to map how education and health workforce governance can be better integrated, (4) to analyse the impact of health workforce mobility on health systems, (5) to optimise the use of international/EU, national and regional health workforce data and monitoring and (6) to build capacity for policy implementation. This article highlights critical knowledge gaps that currently hamper the opportunities of effectively responding to these challenges and advising policy-makers in different health systems. Closing these knowledge gaps is therefore an important step towards future health workforce governance and policy implementation. There is an urgent need for building health workforce research as an independent, interdisciplinary and multi-professional field. This requires dedicated research funding, new academic education programmes, comparative methodology and knowledge transfer and leadership that can help countries to build a people-centred health workforce.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 49 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 123 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 123 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 15%
Researcher 13 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 10%
Other 11 9%
Other 28 23%
Unknown 29 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 26 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 18 15%
Social Sciences 18 15%
Business, Management and Accounting 7 6%
Psychology 4 3%
Other 17 14%
Unknown 33 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 43. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 April 2022.
All research outputs
#738,326
of 21,152,972 outputs
Outputs from Health Research Policy and Systems
#63
of 1,124 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#18,229
of 294,870 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Health Research Policy and Systems
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,152,972 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,124 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 294,870 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them