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Antimalarial drugs for preventing malaria during pregnancy and the risk of low birth weight: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized and quasi-randomized trials

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medicine, August 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

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94 Mendeley
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Title
Antimalarial drugs for preventing malaria during pregnancy and the risk of low birth weight: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized and quasi-randomized trials
Published in
BMC Medicine, August 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12916-015-0429-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Flory Tsobo Muanda, Sonia Chaabane, Takoua Boukhris, Fabiano Santos, Odile Sheehy, Sylvie Perreault, Lucie Blais, Anick Bérard

Abstract

It is known that antimalarial drugs reduce the risk of low birth weight (LBW) in pregnant patients. However, a previous Cochrane review did not evaluate whether the level of antimalarial drug resistance could modify the protective effect of antimalarial drugs in this regard. In addition, no systematic review exists comparing current recommendations for malaria prevention during pregnancy to alternative regimens in Africa. Therefore, we conducted a comprehensive systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the efficacy of antimalarial drugs for malaria prevention during pregnancy in reducing the risk of LBW. We searched PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) for articles published up to 21 November 2014, in English or French, and identified additional studies from reference lists. We included randomized and quasi-randomized studies reporting LBW as one of the outcomes. We extracted data and assessed the risk of bias in selected studies. All pooled analyses were based on a random effect model, and we used a funnel plot and trim and fill method to test and adjust for publication bias. A total of 25 studies met the inclusion criteria (37,981 subjects). Compared to no use, all combined antimalarial drugs were associated with a 27 % (RR 0.73, 95 % CI 0.56-0.97, ten studies) reduction in the risk of LBW. The level of antimalarial drug resistance modified the protective effect of the antimalarial drug used for prevention of LBW during pregnancy. Sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine was not associated with a reduction in the risk of LBW in regions where the prevalence of the dihydropteroate synthase 540E mutation exceeds 50 % (RR 0.99, 95 % CI 0.80-1.22, three studies). The risk of LBW was similar when sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine was compared to mefloquine (RR 1.05, 95 % CI 0.86-1.29, two studies). Prophylactic antimalarial drugs and specifically sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine may no longer protect against the risk of LBW in areas of high-level resistance. In Africa, there are currently no suitable alternative drugs to replace sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine for malaria prevention during pregnancy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 94 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Spain 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Unknown 91 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 21 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 19%
Researcher 12 13%
Other 7 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 7%
Other 18 19%
Unknown 11 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 37 39%
Nursing and Health Professions 11 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 9%
Social Sciences 5 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 5%
Other 11 12%
Unknown 17 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 August 2015.
All research outputs
#1,259,915
of 5,565,912 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medicine
#1,009
of 1,369 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#53,461
of 192,267 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medicine
#69
of 89 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,565,912 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,369 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 25.1. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 192,267 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 89 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.