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Overweight and obese pre-pregnancy BMI is associated with higher hospital costs of childbirth in England

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

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10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
54 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Overweight and obese pre-pregnancy BMI is associated with higher hospital costs of childbirth in England
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12884-018-1893-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Francesca Solmi, Stephen Morris

Abstract

Women who have an overweight or obese BMI are more likely to experience pregnancy complications. However, little is known on the cost of childbirth in this group and no studies have been undertaken in England to date. The aim of this paper is therefore to investigate whether women with overweight and obese pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI) incur higher average hospital costs of childbirth. We employed data from 7564 women in the first wave of data collection of the Millennium Cohort Study. Using interval regression, we investigated the association between hospital costs of childbirth and pre-pregnancy BMI, fitting four models, progressively adjusting for additional potential confounders and mediators. Model 1 was a univariate model; model 2 adjusted for maternal age, education, marital status, ethnicity, income, and region; model 3 additionally included number of previous children, number of babies delivered, whether birth was at term, and type of delivery; model 4 also included length of hospital stay. Childbirth costs incurred by women who were overweight, obese class I and obese class II and III were £22, £82 and £126 higher than those incurred by women whose BMI was in the normal range (p ≤ 0.05). Delivery method, pre-term delivery, and length of hospital stay accounted for the observed difference. Women with elevated pre-pregnancy BMI make greater use of services resulting in higher hospital costs. Interventions promoting healthy BMI in pre-pregnancy among women of child-bearing age have the potential to reduce pregnancy complications and be cost-effective.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 54 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 19%
Student > Bachelor 8 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 9%
Researcher 4 7%
Lecturer 3 6%
Other 6 11%
Unknown 18 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 15%
Social Sciences 5 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 4%
Other 7 13%
Unknown 20 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 October 2018.
All research outputs
#7,027,358
of 13,583,786 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1,423
of 2,475 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#112,322
of 267,421 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,583,786 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,475 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.0. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,421 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them