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Mental distress predicts divorce over 16 years: the HUNT study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, April 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
11 tweeters

Citations

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23 Dimensions

Readers on

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23 Mendeley
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Title
Mental distress predicts divorce over 16 years: the HUNT study
Published in
BMC Public Health, April 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-1662-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mariann Idstad, Fartein Ask Torvik, Ingrid Borren, Kamilla Rognmo, Espen Røysamb, Kristian Tambs

Abstract

The association between mental distress and divorce is well established in the literature. Explanations are commonly classified within two different frameworks; social selection (mentally distressed people are selected out of marriage) and social causation (divorce causes mental distress). Despite a relatively large body of literature on this subject, selection effects are somewhat less studied, and research based on data from both spouses is scarce. The purpose of the present study is to investigate selection effects both at the individual level and the couple level. The current study is based on couple-level data from a Norwegian representative sample including 20,233 couples. Long-term selection effects were tested for by means of Cox proportional hazard models, using mental distress in both partners at baseline as predictors of divorce the next 16 years. Three identical sets of analyses were run. The first included the total sample, whereas the second and third excluded couples who divorced within the first 4 or 8 years after baseline, respectively. An interaction term between mental distress in husband and in wife was specified and tested. Hazard of divorce was significantly higher in couples with one mentally distressed partner than in couples with no mental distress in all analyses. There was also a significant interaction effect showing that the hazard of divorce for couples with two mentally distressed partners was higher than for couples with one mentally distressed partner, but lower than what could be expected from the combined main effects of two mentally distressed partners. Our results suggest that mentally distressed individuals are selected out of marriage. We also found support for a couple-level effect in which spouse similarity in mental distress to a certain degree seems to protect against divorce.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 13%
Unspecified 2 9%
Other 2 9%
Student > Bachelor 2 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 4%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 11 48%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 3 13%
Unspecified 2 9%
Psychology 2 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 12 52%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 49. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 May 2022.
All research outputs
#676,162
of 21,825,352 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#688
of 14,157 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#16,267
of 297,220 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#3
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,825,352 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 14,157 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 297,220 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.