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Distributional ecology of Andes hantavirus: a macroecological approach

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Health Geographics, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

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14 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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77 Mendeley
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Title
Distributional ecology of Andes hantavirus: a macroecological approach
Published in
International Journal of Health Geographics, June 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12942-018-0142-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Francisca Astorga, Luis E. Escobar, Daniela Poo-Muñoz, Joaquin Escobar-Dodero, Sylvia Rojas-Hucks, Mario Alvarado-Rybak, Melanie Duclos, Daniel Romero-Alvarez, Blanca E. Molina-Burgos, Alexandra Peñafiel-Ricaurte, Frederick Toro, Francisco T. Peña-Gómez, A. Townsend Peterson

Abstract

Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) is an infection endemic in Chile and Argentina, caused by Andes hantavirus (ANDV). The rodent Oligoryzomys longicaudatus is suggested as the main reservoir, although several other species of Sigmodontinae are known hosts of ANDV. Here, we explore potential ANDV transmission risk to humans in southern South America, based on eco-epidemiological associations among: six rodent host species, seropositive rodents, and human HPS cases. We used ecological niche modeling and macroecological approaches to determine potential geographic distributions and assess environmental similarity among rodents and human HPS cases. Highest numbers of rodent species (five) were in Chile between 35° and 41°S latitude. Background similarity tests showed niche similarity in 14 of the 56 possible comparisons: similarity between human HPS cases and the background of all species and seropositive rodents was supported (except for Abrothrix sanborni). Of interest among the results is the likely role of O. longicaudatus, Loxodontomys micropus, Abrothrix olivaceus, and Abrothrix longipilis in HPS transmission to humans. Our results support a role of rodent species' distributions as a risk factor for human HPS at coarse scales, and suggest that the role of the main reservoir (O. longicaudatus) may be supported by the broader rodent host community in some areas.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 77 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 77 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 18%
Researcher 13 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 9%
Student > Bachelor 6 8%
Other 11 14%
Unknown 18 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 25 32%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 6%
Environmental Science 5 6%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 4 5%
Other 6 8%
Unknown 26 34%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 December 2020.
All research outputs
#2,577,571
of 18,605,513 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Health Geographics
#113
of 599 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#59,373
of 287,972 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Health Geographics
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,605,513 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 599 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 287,972 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them